Elie Wiesel's Night: Review

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In the fascinating memoir Night by Elie Wiesel, he deals with the struggle of surviving, which was devastating since it was during the holocaust. In the memoir Night, Wiesel uses Symbolism, Simile, and Irony in order to illustrate the events during the holocaust. Wiesel’s use of Symbolism helped the reader understand the captivity of the Jews in the concentration camps.”Father, I said “If that is true then I don’t want to wait. I’ll run into the electrified barbed wire. That would be easier than a slow death in the flames.”(33). Wiesel uses his symbolism when he said “the electrified barbed wire.” It’s being used to show the reader that this is how the atmosphere was during the holocaust. Elie Wiesel, in his autobiography Night, his use of Simile helps the reader to understand the brutal atmosphere of the German Police.” There are 80 of you in the car, the German Officer added,” if any of you are missing, you will be shot like dogs.”(24). He uses his simile language when the train (that the Jews were on) stopped and was guarded by two German police officers. It’s being used to portray the atmosphere of the brutal officers of the Germans. In Elie Wiesel’s Night, Wiesel uses Irony in order to help the reader understand the atmosphere on the train which the Jews were on. “Fire! I see a fire! I see a fire!”(24). Wiesel uses the Irony figurative language when the Jews were on the train to the concentration camps. It was being used to illustrate the savage atmosphere of humans being killed in a huge fire! So Wiesel’s use of Symbolism, Simile, and Irony were in fact helped the reader understand all the events that he wrote about during the holocaust. His point view of the holocaust was very graphic! Even though we never knew about this this is a very historical event on this planet.
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