Electric vs Light Microscopes

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What are some advantages and disadvantages of a light microscope and electron microscope? Some of the disadvantages of the light microscope include, that since it send light, the light waves are diffracted as they pass through the matter. Because of this, light microscopes can only produce clear images of objects to a magnification of about 1000 times. Another problem is that since most living cells are nearly transparent, you can’t see them. So you have to use dyes to stain them. The advantage of using a light microscope however is that you can use it to see cells and cell structures as small as 1 millionth of a meter! Electron microscopes are used to study things even smaller such as viruses or DNA molecules. Some disadvantages include the fact that while using a transmission electron microscope, its beams of electrons can only pass thorough thin samples, cells and tissue must be cut into ultrathin slices before being examined because of this. Images often appear flat and two dimensional also. Another disadvantage is that, electrons, unlike light, don’t come in colors. Scientists use computer techniques to add “false colors” because of this to make certain structures stand out.

Louis Pasteur
Louis Pasteur refuted the notion of spontaneous generation. He conducted an experiment by making to flasks that had “s” shaped tops. He put broth into the flasks, and then he heated them (boiled) to kill all existing bacteria. People assumed that if you left the flasks out that bacteria would grow or be “spontaneously generated” in the broth. It did not however, because the bacteria in the air could not go up the “s” on the flask because of gravity. He broke some of the “s” shapes of the ends of the flask and left some covered and then waited a few days. After a few days had passed, he checked the broths and only that of the broken flask had bacteria in it.
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