Elderly Client Project

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Elderly Client Project
Winston Salem State University

Nursing 3303 October 17, 2012

Elderly Client Project
Mrs. F. Nowell is a ninety-four year old mother, grandmother and great grandmother living in a skilled nursing facility. She has several co-morbidities which are managed medically and chemically within a detailed nursing care plan. She is diagnosed with type II diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, pedal neuropathy, and arthritis. Within this paper we will explore her age related changes, concept of health and wellness, one chronic disease, diabetes, along with the care and health maintenance associated with this chronic illness, compare and contrast medical/nursing care with current research, health promotion, safety and any special concerns, current resources used and community resources not used, and the clients perspective of her own quality of life. Age Related Changes

We begin with age related changes which everyone can see externally, however it’s in part, the individual’s concept of these changes that occur over the life span that help define the person’s health. American’s are living longer and Mrs. Nowell is a prime example of this fact at age ninety-four along with her sister-in-law in the same nursing facility at age one hundred and four. Americans over the age of 65 now comprise almost 13 percent of the United States’ population. Mrs. Nowell notes a definite change in her physical body and abilities. However, though now faced with physical mobility limitations, she admits a life satisfaction and is living a happy and productive life. Common age-related changes she’s experiencing are visual acuity or presbyopia for which she wears glasses to assist in ready, very slight hearing impairment or presbycusis, along with hypertension, coronary artery disease and arthritis. Though Mrs. Nowell does have diabetes, she doesn’t associate this chronic disease with normal aging. She stated “I’ve been a diabetic as long as I can remember.” Obvious integumentary changes are seen, yet no deep, well defined wrinkles, having not been a smoker, and wore hats to protect her face from sun exposure. Mrs. Nowell does appear to have a slight bit of memory loss because when asked how old her husband was when he died she was unable to recall. However, when asked about her childhood and where she grew up, she recounted very vivid memories. This is typical of the aging adult. The speed with which information is processed, stored, and received is decreased; older memories tend to be intact with new memories being recalled less frequently. What is important to remember about the aging population is while they are experiencing moderate physical limitations, they learn to live with them and lead happy and productive lives, as is Mrs. Nowell. Concept of Health and Wellness

Mrs. Nowell’s concept of health and wellness is definitely one of her own perspective. She equates herself to being healthy for a ninety-four year old lady. At ninety-four Mrs. Nowell is mentally healthy with little to no signs of dementia. And because she “has her mind,” she does not see her physical limitations as making her unhealthy. She envisions wellness and her state of well-being as optimal because with the use of her motorized wheelchair she can come and go as she pleases within the confines of the skilled nursing facility in which she lives, as well as, out in the community. She feels she’s definitely one of the healthiest ninety-four year olds she knows because each day she dresses well, though with assistance, puts on her lipstick and matching jewelry. She states when she looks good, she feels good. Chronic Disease and Care to Improve/Maintain Health

Though Mrs. Nowell has several co-morbidities, this paper will focus on her type II diabetes. Diabetes Mellitus is associated with many related health factors of which Mrs. Nowell currently precipitates....
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