Eight Steps of Genocide

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Genocide
* Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part * Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group: Why?

* There has been considerable research on why a perpetrator should want to destroy a group or, if not destroy the group as such, murder people because of their group membership. Motives are often complex and intertwined, but one can usually pull out among the mix a major motive. Some motives are:

To destroy group that is perceived as a threat to the ruling power * Such was also the case with the strong resistance of the Ukrainian farmer to Stalin’s program of collectivization in 1931-32 coupled with the threat of Ukrainian nationalism to communist control. Thus, when what would have been a mild famine hit the region in 1932, Stalin magnified the famine many fold by seizing food and its sources (livestock, pets, seed grain, shooting birds in the trees, etc.) and boycotting the import of food taken away from them before they entered the Soviet Republic. About 5 million Ukrainians were starved to death. To destroy people who are hated, despised, or conversely are envied or resented * The genocide of Jews throughout history and in particular the Holocaust was fundamentally an act of religious and ethnic hatred mixed with envy and resentment over their disproportionate economic and professional achievements. Similarly, with the genocide of the Armenians in Turkey, 1915-18, where Armenians enjoyed wealth and professional status far beyond their numbers, but also were hated as Christians in a Muslim society. To pursue an ideological transformation of society

* Such have been the genocides carried out by communist societies, for example, where those resisting or perceived to be enemies of the ideology are murdered, such as landlords, nationalists, “right-wingers”, and “counterrevolutionaries.” To purify, or attempt to eliminate from society perceived alien beliefs, cultures, practices, and ethnic groups * “Ethnic cleansing,”or” waste disposal,” is terms for this. Examples are the systematic attempt of Mao Tse-Tung and Stalin to eliminate disbelievers from their communist societies; the attempt to do the same by Christianity during the Middle Ages; the elimination of Christian groups and Muslim “blasphemers” in many current Islamic countries such as in Iran and Saudi Arabia; * The ethnic cleansing that the Serbians practiced in Bosnia-Herzegovina in the 1990s; and the war that the Myanmar (Burmese) military have been carrying out against the Karen and other ethnic groups. To obtain economic gain

Thus, colonial powers or individuals (as of Belgium King Leopold who personally owned the Congo Free State) mass murdered tens of millions in their colonies who got in the way, resisted the rape of the colony’s wealth, or were worked to death; and similarly for the mass murder of Indians in the Americas. And thus, many millions were so murdered the process of capturing, transporting, and maintaining slavery. The 8 stages of Genocide

* Understanding the genocidal process is one of the most important steps in preventing future genocides. * The Eight Stages of Genocide were first outlined by Dr.Greg Stanton, Department of State: 1996. * The first six stages are Early Warnings:

* Classification
* Symbolization
* Dehumanization
* Organization
* Polarization
* Preparation
Stage 1: Classification
* “Us versus them”
* Distinguish by nationality, ethnicity, race, or religion. * Bipolar societies (Rwanda) most likely to have genocide because no way for classifications to fade away through inter-marriage. * Classification is a primary method of dividing society and creating a power struggle between groups. Classification (Rwanda)

Belgian colonialists believed Tutsis were naturally superior nobility, descended from the Israelite tribe of Ham. The Rwandan royalty was...
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