Effects on Organ Donation

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EFFECTS OF ORGAN DONATION
FACTS ABOUT ORGAN DONATION
* Like any surgery, after the donation procedure, the wound is closed and no visible mark is present as a tell-tale sign of the surgery. * The organs are removed only after the patient is declared brain dead and within 12 to 24 hours, the organs are removed for transplantation. * The success rate of organ transplantation on an average is between 75% to 85%. * Kidney, lungs, heart, skin, pancreas, liver, bones, eyes and intestines etc. can be donated. The donor family doesn't have to bear the cost of the surgery. * Anyone from a newborn to a 65 year old can donate their organs. Up to 95% of eye donation receivers can see again. * According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, over 90,000 people wait for a new organ and close to 20 people die on an average, due to non availability of the organs. * People also worry that in case of a medical emergency, the surgeons won't do their best to save their life if they are registered as organ donors. This is not true as the staff for organ donations is completely different and surgeons don't consider any life as expendable.

PROS AND CONS
PROS OF ORGAN DONATIONS:

Of course, it’s obvious that donating organs to those in need will save their lives.  If you can save someone from dying, then of course most of us would see this as a highly positive thing.

According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, for every one organ or tissue donor, over 50 lives can be saved or improved. Not only does organ donation affect the lives of the recipient, but also that of the donor and his family. Preserving another’s life can be extremely fulfilling emotionally and may help with individual coping.

Becoming an organ donor can greatly impact the lives of the donor and the recipient, as well as their families. Understanding the vast amount of organs that can be donated can help encourage someone to become an organ donor, whether it be live or post-mortem.

CONS OF ORGAN DONATIONS:

Reasons against organ donation vary a lot depending on the individual.

One of the cons is that before the donation surgery can begin, a family member has to sanction the approval, so it is best to have your family on the same wavelength as yours in this issue.

Another negative aspect of organ transplants is disparity in the number of people donating organs and the number of people who need the transplant. It is said that 1 in 4 people receive the organs in time. 

However many of the perceived 'cons' of organ donation are not in fact cons at all, but rather are based on misconceptions. For instance many individuals incorrectly believe that if they donate organs that they or their family will then need to fund the cost of the operation used to remove the organ. This is a fallacy, and in fact all costs will fall to the recipient.

At the same time many people avoid becoming organ donors as they are afraid it will affect their own medical treatment – i.e. they believe that doctors and surgeons might not try to the best of their ability to save them when they find out they are donors. However this again is a fallacy as the surgeons involved in donations are completely different from those who are going to be saving you. To them no one life is more important than another and they are of course going to focus on saving the person in front of them.

Organs are often not well tested, so if you have something like aids, the organ will be used, and the person you donate to will probably get the virus passed on too.

Rich or important people tend to get priority on the organs, so if you donate via the normal way, your organ will go to those people (and the companies that make money harvesting/selling organs from dead bodies).

A user typed a comment in Yahoo! Answers :
 I have known a few examples of this personally, but if you get almost fatally injured in an accident, you are signed up as an organ...
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