Effects of Typhoon Sendong in Cagayan de Oro

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I. Objective
II. Introduction
III. Causes
IV. Family
a. A First Hand Experience on Typhoon Sendong
b. Effects and Costs
c. Revenues or Sources of Funds
d. Recovery
V. Local
a. Costs
b. Revenues or Sources of Funds
VI. National
a. Costs
b. Revenues or Sources of Funds
VII. Phases of Recovery
a. Disaster Response and Recovery
b. Reconstruction
c. Prevention, Mitigation and Preparedness
VIII. Analysis and Conclusion
IX. Exhibits
X. Sources

I. Objective
To properly account for the value lost to Sendong as well as the costs in relation to the reparation of the damage brought about by the event itself.

II. Introduction
December 16, 2011. Typhoon Sendong devastated the Philippines with its power as it went straight through Northern Mindanao. Infrastructures were destroyed, lives were lost, and dreams were shattered. It was a catastrophe that shocked not only the country, but the whole world.

Cagayan de Oro and Iligan, cities known to be rarely hit by typhoons, were, in this case, the cities directly hit and damaged by the said storm. Sendong came at the dead of the night thus being the main reason that the victims were unprepared. Sendong’s havoc was manifested with an unprecedented flash flood that wrecked the houses and claimed the lives of many, leaving a trail of sorrow in the affected areas.

It was a tragic event that did not only arouse the sympathy of the world but also the good within each Filipino that they would be there for each other at a time of grave need.

Just as fast as the flood came, help was also received. The following days after the flood were days in which Cagayan de Oro’s unity was clearly manifested amongst its citizens. Families, friends, neighbors, and even strangers all helped each other out purely out of willing the good out of the other. Help also came right away from our fellow Filipinos from other parts of the country, as well as the rest of the world in the form of donations.

But sadly, all these help and donations could never bring back what was lost. Nothing will be able to bring back the lives they once had and the loved ones they lost. It is an event that will forever scar the hearts of the victims, Cagayan de Oro, Philippines, the world.

III. Causes
Fingers were pointed as people began asking what caused the calamitous event. Some blamed the excessive logging of forests in the northern and central regions of Mindanao coupled with the topography of this region, situating the two cities as basins to which the water from the higher regions flow out to, resulting to the devastating flood that occurred. Some blamed PAGASA for not giving enough warning over the storm that was to occur and making errors in calculating Sendong’s power and trajectory. And lastly, the local government of Cagayan de Oro city for apparently not taking any actions so as to mitigate the damage of the incoming storm.

It is to be noted that typhoon Sendong was considered a “weak” storm as meteorologists may have it, but the rainfall amount it brought, just like that of Ondoy, was extreme. Cagayan de Oro City had a total of 180mm of rainfall in just one day, significantly higher than the monthly average of 117mm based on statistical data from PAGASA Lumbia station for the years 1977-2005.

It has been observed that the forests located near Cagayan de Oro might have drastically deteriorated and has led to the city’s vulnerability to floods, land-slides, and other disasters caused by the excessive and illegal cutting of trees. This was evidenced by the logs which poured along with the flood which are apparent results of illegal logging. Water, which fell over the 400km radius of Sendong, all poured onto the low-lying cities of Cagayan de Oro and Iligan as the trees that once served as our protection from such forces of...
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