Effects of the Second Great Awakening

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  • Topic: Women's suffrage, Susan B. Anthony, Temperance movement
  • Pages : 2 (614 words )
  • Download(s) : 980
  • Published : February 9, 2011
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Time and time again, people have turned to religion for answers during times of great change, such as the burgeoning industrialization of antebellum America in the 1800's. The Second Great Awakening swept through America as a reaction against the spread of rationalism and the weakening clutch of churches over their followers. With its touch, America grew invigorated over religious beliefs such as equality and temperance. Reform movements sprung and spread like wildfire, affecting nearly every apspect of daily life. The rise of social reform movements can be largely attributed to the Second Great Awakening and if looked in deeper, the industrialization of America and growing liberalism in religion were the roots of the religious revival.

Before the women's rights movement, women were submerged in the "Cult of Domesticity," which dictated that a women's place was in the home. However, females were given an active role in the Second Great Awakening, which was a difference from the First Great Awakening. Women were seen as having finely tuned moral and artistic senses, so they were given the job of bringing their husbands and families back to God. They learned leadership skills and some eventually began turning their ambitions to fighting for their own political rights when they had realized that they had power also. As women became more involved in reform movements, they began pushing and challenging the previous "man's world," and under leadership of feminists such as Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, women declared that all men and women were created equal. This tied in with the idea of equality that was so omnipresent in the Second Great Awakening. Sadly, women did not get all the freedom that they had desired, and had to wait to 1920 to obtain women's suffrage. They were slowly being accepted into colleges and were allowed to own property under certain conditions.

Second Great Awakening revived the traditional ideals of moderation and temperance. In...
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