Effects of Music on the Brain

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Author of message, (Date). Subject of message. Electronic conference or bulletin board (Online). Available e-mail: LISTSERV@ e-mail addressWhat do music and the brain have to do with each other? The brain is two and a quarter pound piece of living tissue that controls the human nervous system. Music on the other hand is a collection of sound waves that multiply through the air and has varying frequencies and tones that follow a distinguishable order. We all are able to recognize the significance of the brain and its physical function. Our minds make up the people we are. The brain mysteriously stores memories and experiences such as emotion, thoughts, and senses. So this is what I and probably thousands of other people would like to know, how does the music affect the mind? And how does music affect how a person acts?? People have their different opinions on the different styles of music, such as classical, jazz, hip hop, rock, country, rap, and many more. Most people agree on the fact that classical music enhances the ability of thinking. But others say that rock music will enhance your brain power. They often have their children and babies listen to classical music such as Bach, Beethoven, Handel, and Mozart.

Music Enhances Concentration Necessary for Studying
Music is known to be food to the soul. Many studies have investigated the effects of music on attention needed for studying. A great deal of studies conducted was to investigate the effects of music, most specifically the Mozart Piece, on the enhancement of intelligence. Music produce soothing effects on the mind, it increases focus when studying or produces a great deal of concentration required for a task. Music is utilized to block out external noise and create a background noise beneficial for the task. Negative effects of music are it could be distracting when studying and the words in music piece interfere with concentration: this is known as the dichotomous effect. Jones et al (2006)...
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