Effects of Music

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Effects of Music

When people are going though a bad break up, new relationship or the lose of a

loved one they turn to music for the answer. To find that, either they’re not alone in there

struggles or to emit their feelings to the world by blasting the radio in the car on your

way to school, work, grocery store...ect. However does the music effect out everyday

reactions in a pessimistic way? Does playing an instrument actually progress your

learning abilities ? Is it possible that music can assist in healing people? Some people

truly believe that music can do impossible things, be the key to unlocking Alzheimers ,

improving focus in students, and change our perception on the world. Others consider

music to be just an enjoyable tune to listen to on the drive home.

Research has already proven that music affects your mood, but does it change

how you would react in normal everyday situations? According to researcher “Jacob Jolij

and student Maaike Meurs of the psychological department of the University of

Groningen , music has an even more dramatic effect on perception: even if

there is nothing to see, people sometimes still see happy faces when they are listening to

happy music and sad faces when they are listening to sad music.”(University of

Groningen) this is true because our brain only allows us to take on our perception of

what we see.

It have been stated that music can make learning easier for a young child by

Enrolling them in music lesson into a child's normal activities. According to a 2004

study, by E. Glenn Schellenberg of the University of Toronto in Ontario, Canada,

discovered that students who took music lessons have higher IQs than students who did

not. Music lessons develop a wide range of skills. Playing an instrument requires

rehearsal, knowledge the musical system and emotional intellect to communicate the

piece's meaning. Developing usual practice habits in these areas can also help children

outside the music room by working study routines and management of time put into

learning a new skill. The process is similar to going to school in that the music student is

learning interactively, either in a group or singular environment. Smaller classrooms have

been made known to boost learning potential, and therefore these smaller, personalized

sessions help develop increased learning attention. Not only that, music lessons can spark

an interest in learning from an early age.

Music can also have an impact on studying and absorption even if the student isn't

involved in lessons. While some are under the belief that a silent classroom was more

likely to promote concentration, Yiftach Levy states in his article (The Effects of

Background Music on Learning) “The idea is being challenged in a completely quiet

classroom is almost unworkable because the sounds of students moving, sharpening

pencils, the gardener mowing the lawn outside the classroom, construction and other

classes across the hall.” Levy's study indicates that soothing, nonpercussive background

tune is helpful at drowning out background noise so students can focus. Using this logic,

music can profit learning because it allows students a greater spotlight and it hosts more

precious study sessions.

Music has also had a major effect on people health, sometimes “something as

simple as beating on small drums together can have remarkable effects. Within moments,

even the most disoriented individuals typically start beating in time with others in the

room and a surprising degree of alertness and cooperation emerges.”(Weiss) “The rhythm

helps organize them in time and space,” music has had a major impact on Alzheimer’s

patients although “Alzheimer's is socially isolating, the beat makes people more aware of

people around them and helps them...
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