Effects of Computer Gaming to the Students

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 1807
  • Published : February 17, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Body
Many studies indicate that violent computer games can have very negative effects on children. New studies indicate that even the non-violent games may have negative effects on a child. Games can have some positive results in helping children deal with stress and to learn difficult school subjects such as math and reading. These same positive games can cause problems for the child in other ways. 1. Short Term Aggression

* The General Aggression Model (GAM), developed by Craig Anderson and Douglas Gentile, indicates that violent computer games can cause short term aggression. The computer games can be more prone to exciting aggression than other entertainment because of the interactive nature of the computer games. Lack of Problem Solving

* Violent computer games teach children that problems can be solved with little or no personal investment or by violence. These games indicate that rather than talking through and taking responsibility for problems, shooting or other acts of violence can elicit correct responses and make problems go away. Weight Gain

* Computer games frequently do not require any additional movements beyond the hands. This coupled with a child's tendency to eat and drink while playing computer games can result in weight gain. Weight gain has been linked to various diseases including diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. Anti-Social Behaviors

* A child who is conditioned to play computer games may find it difficult to socialize with other children. This anti-social behavior can extend through adulthood, making it more difficult for the adult to respond to co-workers in an effective manner. This can also negatively affect relationships and friendships, causing a sense of loneliness.

Read more: The Negative Effects of Computer Gaming on Students | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_6466789_negative-effects-computer-gaming-students.html#ixzz2LDpmUeZB

Regular use of...
tracking img