Effectiveness of Training

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HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Human Resource Management is defined as the people who staff and manage organization. It comprises of the functions and principles that are applied to retaining, training, developing, and compensating the employees in organization. It is also applicable to non-business organizations, such as education, healthcare, etc Human Resource Management is defined as the set of activities, programs, and functions that are designed to maximize both organizational as well as employee effectiveness……………

Scope of HRM without a doubt is vast. All the activities of employee, from the time of his entry into an organization until he leaves, come under the horizon of HRM. The divisions included in HRM are Recruitment, Payroll, Performance Management, Training and Development, Retention, Industrial Relation, etc. Out of all these divisions,one such important division is Training & Development.

Training – Introduction

This activity is both focussed upon, and evaluated against, the job that an individual currently holds education .

This activity focusses upon the jobs that an individual may potentially hold in the future, and is evaluated against those jobs.

Training and personal development is an important method for a business to improve the performance of employees. Training is a process whereby an individual acquires job-related skills and knowledge. It is a cost to firms to pay for the training and also to suffer the loss of working hours whilst an employee is being trained. However, the potential gains from employee training are significant. The main benefits of training are improved productivity and motivation of staff and also better quality products being made. Some of the specific reasons as to why a business should train its employees are: • Introduce new employees to the business (this is known as “induction training”) – see below • Help provide the skills the business needs (in particular making the workforce more flexibleor being trained on new higher technology machinery) • Provide employees with better knowledge about the business and the market it operates in • Provide support for jobs that are complex and for which the required skills and knowledge are often changing (e.g. a firm of lawyers training staff about new legislation) • Support the introduction of new working methods, such as a firm introducing new lean production techniques • Reduce the need for supervision and therefore free up valuable manager timeHelp achieve a good health and safety recordHelp improve quality of a product or service and lower customer complaints • Increase employee motivation and loyalty to the business Induction training

Induction training is important as it enables a new recruit to become productive as quickly as possible. It can avoid costly mistakes by recruits not knowing the procedures or techniques of their new jobs. The length of induction training will vary from job to job and will depend on the complexity of the job, the size of the business and the level or position of the job within the business. The following areas may be included in induction training:

• Learning about the duties of the job
• Meeting new colleagues
• Seeing the layout the premises
• Learning the values and aims of the business
• Learning about the internal workings and policies of the business On-the-job training
On the job training occurs when workers pick up skills whilst working along side experienced workers at their place of work. For example this could be the actual assembly line or offices where the employee works. New workers may simply “shadow” or observe fellow employees to begin with and are often given instruction manuals or interactive training programmes to work through. Off-the-job training

This occurs when workers are taken away from their place of work to be trained. This may take place at training agency or local college, although many larger...
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