Effective Managing Conflict

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Effectively Managing Conflict and Negotiating in the Workplace

Outline & Content

I. Abstract
II. Introduction
III. Types of Conflict
A. Personality Conflict
B. Intergroup Conflict
C. Cross-Cultural Conflict
IV. Managing Conflict
A. Functional Conflict
B. Dysfunctional Conflict
C. Programmed Conflict
D. Stimulation of Conflict
1. Devil Advocacy
2. Dialectic Method
V. Alternate Means Managers Use to Handle Conflict
VI. Management Conflict Styles
VII. Personality Traits in Understanding Conflict
VIII. Management Utilizing Negotiation
A. Types of Negotiation
1. Distributive
2. Integrative
B. Added Value Negotiation
IX. Summary and Conclusion

Abstract:

Conflict in the workplace is a growing concern. Conflict and negotiation in the work place can produce stress and anxiety. Conflict is an inherent part of individuals, groups of individuals or within organizations. Conflict is sometimes ignored in the work environment. Implementing positive attitudes about conflict and effectively learning how to negotiate interpersonally is detrimental to resolving conflict in the workplace. Most often, conflict occur among groups, but research and theory on conflict and negotiation have primarily focused on the interpersonal systems and have begun to look at how management utilizes negotiation to solve intergroup conflict. This helps us to understand that motivation, cognitive and personality traits affect positive end solutions to interpersonal negotiation in the work place. This paper describes the nature of conflict, the types of conflict, managing conflicts and implementing negotiations to resolve conflict and effectively managing conflict in the workplace to obtain a resolution that satisfies all parties involved.

“Conflict occurs when one person or a group of people enforce their goal directed behavior and blocks the goals directed behavior of another person or group of people”[1]. Conflict occurs when two people want the same thing but they block each other from attaining it. Conflict is the process in which one person perceives that his or her interests are being negatively impacted or opposed by another party. Conflict can also be defined as a disagreement with yourself or between individuals whom promotes harm or that presents the opportunity for harm. Many times conflict occurs when individuals or groups of people don’t agree with the beliefs, ideas, values, goals or perspectives or another person or group of people. Conflict may cause individuals distress or havoc in the workplace because it can lead to energy and motivation levels being diverted away from job tasks and decreased production and performance levels. Conflict can also occur within various departments throughout the organization, or sometimes between the organization and an individual.

There are three types of conflict that a manager or supervisor will likely be presented the opportunity of dealing with: personality conflict, intergroup conflict and cross-cultural conflict. Personality conflict is interpersonal opposition based on individual dislike, dissatisfaction and sometimes disagreement. Personality conflict is often caused by emotion and perceptions about another’s character or motives. A good example of this is when a supervisor reprimands an associate for coming to work late because the supervisor perceives the associates as not being a team player and even lazy. The associate may feel that the supervisor is out to get him. Improperly handling personality conflicts in the workplace can lead to sexual harassment and legal implications of diversity. “Workplace envy can also generate personality conflict.”[2]

Intergroup conflict is a circumstance in which groups take...
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