Effect of Technology on Communication

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Effect of Technology on Communication

Summary: this is a 6-page paper on the effects of technology and the WWW on culture, human and organizational values and communication. Introduction

Have computers changed the life of the average man like electricity did centuries ago? Has it made a difference to his life or had an impact on the way that he lives? Could the common man with the average facilities in life coming off his average salary have been able to stay in touch with his people in far away lands? Would he have been able to do work that took ages to get done within a matter of seconds with all but a flick of his fingers? The average student with the average I.Q coming from the middle class home, would he have been able to access the same amount of information that his wealthy or more able counterparts would at the click of a mouse like he can now? The answer to all these questions is a no. Man could not have imagined that such a tremendous change would come about making men and women on all sides of the world, from different regions and continents into a community. Today men, women, children from different faiths, beliefs, cultures, ideologies, regions are all part of the net community. They meet without the inhibitions and obstacles of real life. In a sense technology has increased and improved communication between human beings but the fact that it is mostly done across the barrier of a screen and keyboard has changed the way we respond to people, emotions and relationships. Human interaction is undergoing a metamorphosis, as is the way we deal with information.

Technological Advances
Nothing epitomizes the modern life of today's age better than the computer. For better or worse, computers have infiltrated and seeped into every single social and working aspect of our society. Today computers are found everywhere; be it at the super market where the scanners will calculate the grocery bill all the while keeping store inventory or be it the oh-so-loved ATM (automatic teller machines) that help one to keep finances in order no matter what corner of the world they might be in. [4] People are addicted to their PC's. 'In the past 10 years, new electronic technologies have traveled from laboratory to home with astonishing speed. The survey found that 6 percent of Americans have a fax machine, 12 percent have computer modems, 28 percent have video cameras, and 4 percent have satellite dishes. Along with video games, telephone services, and other high-tech inventions, these gadgets have become staples of the modern home -- at least for those that can afford them. Even in households that can't afford computers, technology has made itself known in the form of automatic banking and videocassette recorders. The survey of more than 4,000 households found that half use an ATM card and 85 percent own a VCR.' [5] Starting out as a small military experiment some 35 years ago, the Internet is quickly becoming one of the most popular forms of communication. With a present population of about 40 million users world wide, it seems to have a very promising future. Uncensored and almost impossible to monitor, it's a breeding ground for all sorts of offensive and derogatory information but these very issues have now led to the beginning of some sort of legislature to control the worldwide web. Though marketing officials would have us believe that the Internet has indeed taken over the world spread of usage among persons of different economic, educational, and cultural backgrounds is far from universal, and serious obstacles remain before computerized telecommunications will be as easy, carefree, and widespread as is portrayed in commercial advertisements. Today primarily an elite minority of the world population uses the Internet. [6] Companies, organizations and individuals in developed countries dominate this minority though usage is spreading to the third world. [6] Future for the Internet is looking very bright. No...
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