Effect of Marijuana

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Mariano Marcos State University
College of Engineering
Batac, Ilocos Norte

“In Partial Fulfillment for the Requirements in English 2”

Title
“The Process and Development of
Communication Systems”

Presented to:
Professor Constante S. Salasac

Presented by:
Shaun Matthew A. Vicencio
BSECE 1-A

March 2012

TITLE: “The Process and development of communication systems” THESIS STATEMENT: “Intake of marijuana, whether excessive or not, has different effects to the health of individuals that eventually affects the community as a whole” I. INTRODUCTION

a. BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY
i. Definition
ii. History
1. Laws of bills
II. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
b. Interpretation of collected data
iii. Reception of people towards marijuana
2. Positive perspective
3. Negative perspective
4. Effects of marijuana
a. Physiological
b. Social
c. Emotional
d. Community
III. CONCLUSION
IV. REFERENCE LIST
INTRODUCTION
Marijuana—often called pot, grass, reefer, weed, herb, Mary Jane, or MJ—is a greenish-gray mixture of the dried, shredded leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers of Cannabis sativa—the hemp plant. Most users smoke marijuana in hand-rolled cigarettes called joints, among other names; some use pipes or water pipes called bongs. Marijuana cigars, or blunts, are also popular. To make blunts, users slice open cigars, remove some of the tobacco, and mix the remainder with marijuana (Timberlake 2009).

Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug (15.2 million past-month users) according to the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). That year, marijuana was used by 75.6 percent of current illicit drug users (defined as having used the drug some time in the 30 days before the survey) and was the only drug used by 53.3 percent of them.

Marijuana use is widespread among adolescents and young adults. According to the Monitoring the Future Survey—an annual survey of attitudes and drug use among the Nation's middle and high school students—most measures of marijuana use decreased in the past decade among 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-graders. However, this decline has stalled in the past few years as attitudes have softened about marijuana's risks. In 2009, 11.8 percent of 8th-graders reported marijuana use in the past year, and 6.5 percent were current users. Among 10th-graders, 26.7 percent had used marijuana in the past year, and 15.9 percent were current users. Rates of use among 12th-graders were higher still: 32.8 percent had used marijuana during the year prior to the survey, and 20.6 percent were current users.

The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN), a system for monitoring the health impact of drugs, estimated that in 2008, marijuana was a contributing factor in over 374,000 emergency department (ED) visits in the United States, with about two-thirds of patients being male, and 13 percent between the ages of 12 and 17.

Talking to our children about drug abuse is not always easy, but it is crucial. You can also get involved in your community and seek out drug abuse prevention programs that you and your child can participate in together.

Why do young people use marijuana? Children and teens start using marijuana for many reasons. Curiosity and the desire to fit into a social group are common ones. Some have a network of friends who use drugs and urge them to do the same (peer pressure). Those who have already begun to smoke cigarettes and/or use alcohol are at heightened risk for marijuana use as well. And children and teens who have untreated mental disorders (e.g., ADHD, conduct disorder, anxiety) or who were physically or sexually abused are at heightened risk of using marijuana and other drugs at an early age. BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY

DEFINITION:
Marijuana (grass, pot, weed) is the common name for a crude drug made from the...
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