Educational Management, Policy and Curriculum

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TASK: Interrogate the new constitution especially chapter 43 1(f) that states that every person has the right to education. The article has not been legislated for enactment, by the parliament as per the fifth schedule article 26 1 (i) of the constitution. What are the implications and issues that might arise if this article is not enacted with immediate effect (30 MKS). DATE OF SUBMISSION: 24TH OCTOBER 2011

Education, also called learning, is any act that in general sense, leaves a formative impact on the mind, and behaviour of an individual. It is the main process by which the society deliberately conveys knowledge, skills and useful values form generation to generation. Educated persons hence have an optimal and sound state of mind regardless of their state and situation. They are, therefore, able to perceive accurately, think clearly and effectively, to achieve their goals and ambitions.

The right to education has been created and recognized by some jurisdictions: the United Nations and the European Union are among the main international bodies that have kept education at the forefront of the human maturity. Article 2 of the first protocol to the European Union Convention on Human Rights obliges all signatory parties to guarantee the right to education. The United Nation also has a similar act. Kenya is just enjoying the aftermath of a successful referendum that saw the country getting a new constitution, which is thought of as one of the best constitutions in the word. The right to education is among the central rights of a Kenyan Citizen according to this constitution. This essay exhaustively interrogates the right to education according to Kenyan Constitution, and gives the implications that may arise if this right is not granted to the Kenyan Citizen. Education is a fundamental human right and essential for the exercise of all other human rights. It promotes individual freedom and empowerment and yields important development benefits. Yet millions of children and adults remain deprived of educational opportunities, many as a result of poverty. Normative instruments of the United Nations and UNESCO lay down international legal obligations for the right to education. These instruments promote and develop the right of every person to enjoy access to education of good quality, without discrimination or exclusion. The right to education has been included in the Kenyan constitution, and what remains is for the government to fulfill their obligation both legal and political in regard to providing education for all of good quality and to implement and monitor more effectively education strategies.

Education is a powerful tool by which economically and socially marginalized adults and children can lift themselves out of poverty and participate fully as citizens. Education is not, and should not be regarded as a priviledge for the chosen few, but as an entitlement for every citizen. It should be regarded as a fundamental right to which every Kenyan child, youth and adult should be, and is entitled and be accessible to all. At the moment, Kenya has a very high level of illiteracy, rating at over 64% of illiterate Kenyans. This implies that the government should take the first place in promoting the growth of Education among its citizens, especially the youth, in a bid to hit vision 2030.

Education empowers individuals by equipping them with the knowledge, skills and attitudes they need to become enlightened, productive and responsible citizens. It is through education that the citizens of a country will develop a rational judgment towards events and be able to fight for their rights as well as exercise prudent use of their intrinsic freedom. In order to meet its standards on...
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