Education

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EDUCATION:

A
FUNDAMENTAL
RIGHT OF THE
CITIZENRY

PREFACE

Education: A Fundamental Right of the Citizenry is a term paper made to show the concept of learning throughout life meets the challenges posed by a rapidly changing world. This term paper deserves the full and collective support of all the students involving a mindset that consider education as the factor in ensuring sustainable growth of the community.

Education: A Fundamental Right of the Citizenry involves the learning of every student who immediately says that the art of learning is difficult yet if we are persevering, we shall soon improve our knowledge. It formally introduces the History, Development and a New Curriculum adopt by our school system and how its implementation affect the country as well as the peolpe. There are also answers given here to some certain questions and problems that most individuals ask.

THE AUTHORS

i
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Writing a term paper is certainly not an easy task for beginners like us who never experienced yet how difficult it is to make one. We would like to express our heartfelt gratitude to the following people who took part in making this term paper possible and successful:

*To our ever supportive and loving parents for their moral and financial support and encouragement in making this term paper.

*To our English teacher, Mrs. Marianita Patayon who let us made this term paper on our own but also guided us how to make it.

We would also like to express our sincere thanks:

*To the people who shared their ideas, thoughtful criticisms and suggestions concerning our topic.

*And lastly to our Almighty God for His unconditional love and His Holy presence that made us accomplished this term paper on time.
ii

Chapter I

ALL ABOUT THE PROBLEM

1
INTRODUCTION
In pre-Spanish times, education was informal and unstructured in some areas. Children were provided more vocational training and less academics by their parents in the houses of tribal tutors. When the Spanish arrived in Manila, though, they were surprised to find out a population with literacy rate using a system of writing known as Baybayin which was higher than the literacy rate of Madrid. Under the Spanish, education of indigenous population was initially left to religious orders, with primary education being overseen by parish friars who generally tolerated the teaching of only religious topics. The friars, recognizing the value of a literate indigenous population, built printing presses to produce material in Baybayin. The friars, made tremendous efforts to educate the native population learning the local languages and the Baybayin script to better communicate with the locals. The Spanish missionaries established schools immediately on reaching the islands and wherever they penetrated, church and school went together. There was no Christian village without its school and all young people attended. The Augustinians opened a school in Cebu in 1565. The Franciscans in 1577 immediately took to the task of teaching the natives how to read and write, besides industrial and agricultural techniques. The Jesuits in 1581 also mainly concentrated on teaching the young. They were followed by the Dominicans in 1587, which started a school in their first mission at Bataan. The Chinese language version of the Christian Doctrine was the first book printed in the Philippines in about 1590 to 1592. A version in Spanish, and Tagalog, in both Latin script and the commonly used Baybayin...
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