Edna Pontellier vs. Mrs. Mallard

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In the short story, The Story of an Hour and the novel The Awakening, the author Kate Chopin uses the characters Mrs. Mallard and Edna to portray the lives of women in the 1800s. Both characters are very similar to one another, but the differences though a little abstract balance the similarities. Also the author uses nature to display both of the character’s feelings towards their dreams.

Edna and Mrs. Mallard are both victims of the 1800s, they both show that by their displeasure in being married. Edna shows her displeasure in novel by frolicking around with other men, and by openly disagreeing with her husband which at that time was a social faux pas. Mrs. Mallard showed her displeasure by simply liking the fact that she was finally free of her husband. She cried for him a little, but then in his death she finally recalled things that she hasn’t noticed lately. She hears the birds twittering and the wind rustling which remind her of her life, and how now with her husband dead she can finally live her life the way she wants too. Edna realizes that she wants to live her life when she first understands her role in life and doesn’t want to accept that all she will ever be is a housewife, this happens after she acquires her new ability to swim, that she finally sees that she wants to live. Edna tries to gain her freedom by becoming someone other then a housewife; she starts to paint again and sells her art. After that she buys herself a nice little apartment which she can call her own. This signifies her creating her identity. Mrs. Mallard’s dream of being free of her husband also sets her apart from other women of her time.

While they both have many similarities, they also have many differences. Mrs. Mallard never had time to develop her identity and to pursue any of her dreams because she is shocked to death by the fact that she finds out that her husband is actually alive. This sets her apart from Edna, because unlike Edna Mrs. Mallard never really feels...
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