Editing of a Gangster Film

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  • Topic: French New Wave, Bonnie and Clyde, Film editing
  • Pages : 3 (1207 words )
  • Download(s) : 250
  • Published : December 15, 2011
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Stephanie Guzman
#0714293
Film 1 | Professor Daughdrill
16 November 2011

Capture. Feel. Enhance. The Secret? Editing.
Bonnie & Clyde portrays the love filled action story of an amazing duo. This movie was one of the first to depict actual violent scenes, as well as intensely frisky ones. During the 1960’s, the French New Wave directors began influencing a vast majority of films, Bonnie & Clyde being one of them in 1967. With so many tones and action filled scenes, the technique and style of the editing in the film is an important factor which helps set up the entire tone of the movie. The film Bonnie & Clyde, by Arthur Penn, utilizes pace, rhythm, and certain French New Wave editing techniques to portray and enhance tranquil, frisky, intense and even violent tones in scenes throughout the movie. The rhythm of slow paced shots in the film are used several of times to illustrate scenes which do not include much action, more over include tranquil moments. This would include scenes when Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were simply driving or waiting in their car, for example, when they were waiting in the car for C.W. Moss to get back from buying the “light bulbs” for his dad. That scene started with a long lengths medium long shot. In addition, the movie opens with Bonnie Parker standing and wandering around in her room. As she roams around, there is a series of close-up shots, which run slower-paced than most shots. Then, the moment Bonnie spots Clyde Barrow, an extreme-close-up of her eyes occurs. The calmness and boredom of Bonnie Parker is portrayed through the steady but slowly paced close-up shots. The following immediate shot to her eyes show and mark one of the most important moments of the film, when Bonnie and Clyde first lay eyes on each other. The use of shots in this sequence enhanced the projection of the tone as well as the tranquil, calm moods of the story. In order to create a frisky, affection filled scene, Arthur Penn uses a...
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