Editing in Run, Lola, Run

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Editing: Run, Lola, Run

Run, Lola, Run is a 1995 German film directed by Tom Tykwer and edited by Mathilde Bonnefoy. The editing in Run, Lola, Run is extensive with almost 2000 transitions. Since the film does not always use continuity editing it allows the audience to focus on the style as well as the narrative. Bonnefoy’s fast paced editing in Run, Lola, Run creates a sense of urgency and disarray among the audience, furthering the film’s narrative.

The film opens up with a phone conversation between Lola and her boyfriend Manni. Bonnefoy uses editing in this scene to convey the characters’ emotions to the audience. At the beginning of the scene shots of Lola were longer than shots of Manni to communicate that she was calm while Manni was frightened and angry. As the scene went on however and Lola learned of Manni’s situation the shots of her became faster and more urgent. Lola learns that she needs to get 100,000 marks in 20 minutes in order to save Manni. She desperately begins thinking of whom she can ask for help and decides upon her father. This is the scene in which the pace of the film is set.

Lola is seen running out her door to her father’s office. While following Lola’s run the editor uses many transitions and jump cuts to further create a sense of urgency. While Lola is running to her father we cross-cut between her and Manni. This cross-cutting allows the audience to examine Lola and Manni’s actions at the same time and create a feeling of apprehension at what will happen next. Another technique that Bonnefoy uses is parallel editing. After Lola leaves her father’s office empty handed she frantically begins running to meet Manni. As time begins running out and the situation becomes more urgent Bonnefoy uses parallel editing to put shots of Lola, Manni, and a clock ticking on screen together to convey to the audience that time was running out and the consequences of Lola not making it to Manni on time.

Mathilde Bonnefoy’s phenomenal...
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