Ecumenical Developments in Australia

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 298
  • Published : April 1, 2006
Open Document
Text Preview
Account for TWO ecumenical development in Australian Christianity since World War II. Ecumenism, in the sense of Australian Christianity, is the religious initiative towards unity within the Christian church. It is the promotion of co-operation and improved understanding between distinct religious groups or denominations within Christianity and other religions.

The NCCA is an example of an ecumenical movement – it brings together a number of Australia's Christian churches in dialogue and practical support. It was also the first recognized coalition between the Catholic Church and other leading Christian faiths.

Out of the desolation of World War II sprang the Australian Committee for the World Council of Churches. This developed into the Australian Council of Churches which, in 1994, grew to be the National Council of Churches in Australia. The NCCA is 15 Christian churches, gathered from across Australia, who have embarked on a pilgrimage together . Each brings a widely diverse record of place, experience, and theology, but all share a mutual faith and confession in the Jesus Christ as God and Savior. All share a common future as they are confident that the future of Christians in Australia lies together, not in division. The aim of the NCCA is to deepen the relationship of member churches so as to communicate more visibly the unity willed by Christ and to rally towards the achievement of their mission of common witness, proclamation and service .

On behalf of 85% of the country's Christians, it could prove to be the country's most influential lobby group. The council has made proposals to governments on behalf of member churches. It has lobbied governments about the dole, the GST on food and boosting the Aboriginal health budget. It has intensely spoken out against the Australian government's policy of detaining refugees and has requested for children to be freed from detention camps.

Over the years...
tracking img