Economics Blog -Natural Calamaties

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Calami

Echoes of Mourning

"We have suffered enough," Felicitas Cabusao said, clutching a Holy Rosary beside her crying 12-year-old daughter.

“We have only enough for a few days. We don’t even know if we can survive the next week” said, the woman as she was holding her daughter tight.

“We have no more work.” said, another victim.

“We have no more homes.”

“There would be no Christmas for us.”

Just recently, calamities such as intense earthquakes, great storms, hurricanes and typhoons have devastated nations around the world. One of these nations is the Philippines. Each year, about 20 typhoons hit the Philippines, often causing death and destruction. Typhoon Washi (“Sendong”) killed around 1,500 people on Mindanao last 2011; and last December of 2012, Typhoon Bopha hit Southern Mindanao- the strongest typhoon to hit Philippines on that year. A particular article stated that Typhoon Bopha’s aftermath numbered up to 850 missing bodies, 1020 deaths, and 27,000 who are still affected.

As all these things have happened, my heart kept being disturbed. It is not enough for me to feel sorry for them. I thought…”If seeing them like this, pierces my heart, what more could I ever feel if I were in their shoes. These people might feel like they've been ignored by the government, been left out by the world – and worse—forgotten by God. “

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As all these things have happened, my heart kept being disturbed. It is not enough for me to feel sorry for them. I thought…”If seeing them like this, pierces my heart, what more could I ever feel if I were in their shoes. These people might feel like they’ve been ignored by the government, been left out by the world – and worse—forgotten by God. “

Hearing upon the news, the government, various schools, organizations, institutions, agencies and other neighboring countries immediately sent out help to these people(Continual help are still given up until now). They have reached out to them through rescue teams, health services, provision of food and other necessities, and the provision of evacuation areas.

Pictures (help form govt and organization)

Fortunately, our University called out to students to give donations to the victims and asked some volunteers to repack relief goods. So I, with a simple act of donating clothes and water bottles, did my part. At the back of my mind, these things that I offer could only help a few victims; but if each individual would donate and give time to help, that’ll result to a great wave of rescue survival team. I’m glad that I was able to help.

Still feeling the urge to lend a hand, sometime around the 2nd week of December, my relatives and I went to New Bataan. We went there to send off relief goods and to talk to some other relatives and friends. As we were heading there, we saw how difficult their lives were: Houses no longer have roofs, plantations were swept away, signs of “we need food” were everywhere, a truck load of goods were surrounded with people clamoring for food, families (especially the children) were lining up the streets to ask for help, the ground was still being dug in search of dead bodies, and other rough events.

` We also talked to a few people that we know there. They were happy and grateful when we arrived. Some were laughing, gathering around, while others were helping fellow victims too. One of them told their story about how they were able to survive. She was trying to take a good bright smile as she was narrating it. She was even able to make good jokes out of their situation. Suddenly, a woman came near her, talked to her for a while and they hugged so tight that I even could feel the warmth of their embrace. At that moment, the woman-the victim- who tried to narrate her story with a smile, burst into tears. She was trying to be strong. She wanted to be strong for those victims who were...
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