Economic Crisis in Europe

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  • Topic: European Union, European Central Bank, Eurozone
  • Pages : 6 (1996 words )
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  • Published : March 26, 2013
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How does Economic Crisis Affect European Union and how Does EU Reacts Introduction to the European Union and the Economic Crisis

It is a fact world wide that we are facing an economic crisis. There are many Countries inside European Union that can hardly respond to the values of the crisis. The whole commission has to Decide and act properly for all those countries that can hardly respond to the crisis. The depth and breath of the current global financial crisis is unprecedented in post-war economic history.

It has several features in common with similar financial-stress driven crisis episodes. It was preceded by relatively long period of rapid credit growth, low risk premiums, abundant availability of liquidity, strong leveraging, soaring asset prices and the development of bubbles in the real estate sector. Stretched leveraged positions and maturity mismatches rendered financial institutions very vulnerable to corrections in asset markets, deteriorating loan performance and disturbances in the wholesale funding markets. Such episodes have happened before and the examples are abundant (e.g. Japan and the Nordic countries in the early 1990s, the

Asian crisis in the late-1990s). But the key difference between these earlier episodes and the current crisis is its global dimension. ( http://ec.europa.eu/economy_finance/publications/publication15887 ) THE CRISIS FROM A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

A perfect storm. This is one metaphor used to describe the present global crisis. No other economic downturn after World War II has been as severe as today's recession. Although a large number of crises have occurred in recent decades around the globe, almost all of them have remained national or regional events - without a global impact. So this time is different - the crisis of today has no recent match. To find a downturn of similar depth and extent, the record of the 1930s has to be evoked. Actually, a new interest in the depression of the 1930s, commonly classified as the Great Depression, has emerged as a result of today's crisis. By now, it is commonly used as a benchmark for assessing the current global downturn. The purpose of this chapter is to give a historical perspective to the present crisis. In the first section, the similarities and differences between the 1930s depression and the present crisis concerning the

geographical origins, causes, duration and impact of the two crises are outlined. As both depressions were global, the transmission mechanism and the channels propagating the crisis across countries are analyzed. Next, the similarities and differences in the policy responses then and now are mapped. Finally, a set of policy lessons for today are extracted from the past. A word a warning should be issued before making comparisons across time. Although the statistical data from previous epochs are far from complete, historical national accounts research and the statistics compiled by the League of Nations offer comprehensive evidence for this chapter. Of course, any historical comparisons should be treated with caution. There are fundamental differences with earlier epochs concerning the structure of the economy, degree of globalization, nature of financial innovation, state of technology, institutions, economic thinking and policies. Paying due attention to them is important when drawing lessons.

(http://ec.europa.eu/economy_finance/publications/publication15887 ) Responses to Crisis

In a single market and a huge trading bloc like the EU, coordination of national economic policies is important. Through such coordination, the EU can act with speed and consistency when faced with economic challenges, as the current economic and financial crisis. Sixteen countries have even one step further by adopting the euro currency. The framework for cooperation in economic policy is Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), whose members are all EU countries is a framework within which countries agree common guidelines...
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