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Frankenstein: A Modern Fable

Abstract: Frankenstein, the world classic novel is written by Mary Shelley, the 19th Century English writer. Since its publication, Frankenstein has mostly been acclaimed and studied as a Gothic novel, or as a science fiction. Recently, scholars have also begun to approach it from religious or feministic points of view. Marry Shelley’s concern over human beings’ unlimited pursuit of ultimate knowledge is an often ignored theme, that is, human beings abuse of scientific knowledge may lead to tragedies. Standing in the view of eco - literature, this thesis points out that science and technology are not perfect but have two sides, which request us never to pursue science blindly but to apply it reasonably under the guidance of humanism so that nature and man may live together in perfect harmony. Key words: Frankenstein, Ecological Meaning, Science and Technology Warning

Contents

1. Introduction………………………………………………………………………..1 1.1 The Introduction of Frankenstein…………………………………………….1 1.2 The Background of Frankenstein and Modern Meaning…………………...2 2. The Ecological Meaning of Frankenstein……………………………………...…2 2.1 Sciences ------ a Double-edged Sword…..…………………………………….2 2.2 The Relationship between Man and the Natural Environment……...….….4 2.3 The Social Warning of Frankenstei………………………………….………..6 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………….6 Works Cited……………………………………………………………......................8 1. Introduction

1.1 The Introduction of Frankenstein
Frankenstein is a widely known fiction by Mary Shelley, the English female writer in 19th century. Since its first publication in 1816, it has already been translated into over 100 languages. In recent years, Frankenstein even becomes a hit in English and American literature as there are more than tens of operas and films editions adapted from the original novel. Nowadays Frankenstein becomes a common use when it is referred as “a person who creates something that brings about his ruin” also is called Frankenstein's monster “ a thing that destroys its creator” (Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner's English Dictionary [5th Edition], 563).

This world classic work was started from a literature game. When Mary Shelley aged 19, she and her lover (later husband) Percy Shelley visited Lord Byron at the Villa Diodati by Lake Geneva in Switzerland. Due to the dreary and cold weather, the group retired indoors until dawn. Among the subjects, the conversation turned to the experiments of the 18th century natural philosopher and poet Erasmus Darwin, who was said to have animated dead matter, and to galvanism and the feasibility of returning a corpse or assembled body parts to life. Sitting around a log fire at Byron’s villa, the company also amused themselves by reading German ghost stories, prompting Byron to suggest they each write their own super natural tale. Shortly afterwards, in awaking dream, Mary conceived the idea for Frankenstein. The story was placed in Europe. The young scientist Victor Frankenstein went to England to study. After some time of researching, he discovered the mystery of human body and created a strange being, an ugly monster. Victor was so shocked by the ugly appearance of the monster that he left him with hate. Since then, the monster faced a world full of aversion and fear. He could not bear the heavy burden of being a strange creature, so he made up his mind to revenge on his creator, Victor Frankenstein. After some time, he asked Victor to make him a wife on condition that he would not do harm to him. Victor felt sorry for the monster and agreed at first but soon he regretted. Thinking of the terrible result that might bring, he broke his promise. The monster was mad at him and took crazier revenge on Victor by committing some other murders. At the end, Victor decided to destroy his creature and followed the monster to the North Pole where he died from heavy diseases. Finally, the monster realized the...
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