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Our life is full of hustle and bustle and often it has more resemblance to a rat race than to a bed of roses. When problems seem to be endless and one continuously has to combat them and be under relentless and constant pressure, he may develop symptoms of what is generally called and known as ‘depression’. Depression can be found among people of any age (whether children, adults or elderly people) and walk of life but symptoms are rather similar. Depressive disorders come in different forms, just as do other illnesses such as heart disease. One of the most prevalent forms is dysthymia. (1, 1997)

Dysthymia has recently been diagnosed as its own unique subdivision of depression. What distinguishes dysthymia from Major Depressive Disorders is both the severity and length of the depression condition observed. Recent research suggests that Dysthymia can be treated effectively with appropriate treatment such as supportive counseling , Talk Therapy , complementary and alternative medicine and pet therapy. (4, 1997)

I would like to acknowledge the great resources for this paper such as BC Medical Journal and American Journal of Psychiatry.

Dysthymia is a mild, chronic depression which lasts for two years or longer. Most people with this disorder continue to function at work or school but often with the feeling that they are "just going through the motions". The person may not realize that they are depressed. Anti-depressants or psychotherapy can help. (1, 1997) Symptoms of dysthymia are subtler than those of major depression but they can undermine a person's ability to enjoy life and reach their full potential. Together with a chronically low mood, symptoms of dysthymia include: (1) Chronic fatigue (2) Poor self-esteem, (3) Difficulties concentrating and (4) Chronic upsets in appetite and sleep. (4, 1997)

To begin with, psychological treatment for depression i.e. psychotherapy includes...
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