Dyig to Be Thin

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Dying to Be Thin

A Look Into the Life of an Anorexic and the Health Risk That Come With It

By: Andrew Peterson

1.       What did you see regarding ideal body weight?   What other attitudes exist about weight?

When watching the video, I realized that anorexics don’t want to eat. They don’t feel hungry; they don’t think that they are destroying themselves. When they look at themselves, they see themselves as fat and overweight. To try and fit the image of what they think they should look like becomes an obsession. This eventually leads the large percentages of weight loss. Most anorexics, it seems, ideal body weight was 15 to 20 percent below their recommended body weight (according to their age and height).

2.       List some medical complications associated with prolonged starvation.

Anorexia can come with numerous complications. Death is the worse complication that can occur from the disorder, and it doesn’t necessarily have to be caused by being severely under weight, it may result form abnormal heart rhythms or an imbalance of electrolytes that maintain the balance of fluids in your body.

Complication of Anorexia:

~Death

~Anemia

~Heart problems, such as mitral valve prolapse, abnormal heart rhythms and heart failure

~Bone loss, increasing risk of fractures later in life

~In females, absence of a period

~In males, decreased testosterone

~Gastrointestinal problems, such as constipation, bloating, nausea.

~Electrolyte abnormalities, such as low blood potassium, sodium and chloride

~Kidney problems

If a person with anorexia becomes severely malnourished, every organ in the body can sustain damage, including the brain, heart and kidneys. This damage may not be fully reversible, even when the anorexia is under control.

Some people commonly also have other mental disorders as well.

Other Common Mental Disorders Experienced By Anorexics:

~Depression

~Anxiety Disorders

~Personality Disorders

~Obsessive-compulsive disorder

~Drug abuse

3.       How many suffer from anorexia and bulimia?

Around 8 million people suffer from anorexia or bulimia. Around 5 to 10 percent of all females suffer form the two eating disorders. One out of every 200 American women suffer from anorexia, and about two to three in 100 American women suffers form bulimia. About 10to15 percent of people with anorexia or bulimia are males.

Adolescents are very susceptible to this disease; they are trying to form a self-image of themselves. Other people influence this self-image. If they are constantly told that they are ugly or fat, that can become their self-image. Thus, diseases such as anorexia and bulimia are on the rise. Anorexia is the third most common chronic illness among adolescents. 50 percent of girls between the ages 11 and 13 see themselves as overweight, and 80 percent of 13-year-olds have attempted to lose weight.

Eating disorders are on the rise in both genders and in a wide range of age groups. More and more people need help and don’t realize this. Awareness is an important of their treatment. They must be aware to accept.

4.       Why are eating disorders a growing problem?

People are constantly exposed to media that shows them amazing ways to lose weight and tells them what their body should look like. After so much exposure, people really start to hate themselves. Looking at the beautiful models and actresses they see on TV makes them feel inferior. Therefore they go on “diets” that eventually result in them developing an eating disorder. People begin to loath themselves, this results in them losing weight rapidly, which is what they want, but they also experience serious health problems.

Eating disorders are a growing problem in teens, as teenagers are forming their identity, the look to the successful people around them. They want to be like that, so they want to do everything they did. Stick thin...
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