Drug Use

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Protective and risk factors behaviours of young people related to drug use.
My health issue is drug use.

Young teenagers goes through the phase of adolescence when they have to start making decisions relating to themselves and their health too. Sometimes this procedure of making decisions can be hard for them as there are protective and risk behaviours associated with it which they might or might not be aware of it and ignore it as most of the people do.

Protective behaviours are those health behaviours that are likely to improve a person’s level of health. Risk behaviours are those health behaviours that are found to contribute to the development of health problems or poorer levels of health. For example - health behaviours such as being protective behaviours, because they are likely to improve good health (such as eating adequate amounts of fruit and vegetables), or risk behaviours because they have been found to contribute to the development of health problems or poorer levels of health (for example, smoking). The health and social behaviours that are adopted or reinforced during this time often continue into adulthood, so it is in the best benefit of the individual to know the protective and risk behaviour associated with that health issue.

Young people may experiment with substances such as tobacco, alcohol and other illicit drugs. The use of all these drugs poses a risk to the health of young people, with their misuse likely to cause numerous short and long-term health problems themselves or/and the general community. One of the main issues that young people deal with are drug use. Drugs are a substance which affects the way the mind and the body works. It can be natural or manufactured. It can be legal or illegal. Prescription drugs are stronger legal drugs given by a doctor for medication. Examples of legal drugs: Alcohol, caffeine, tobacco. Examples of Illegal drugs: Cocaine and heroin. A drug must be able to pass from your body into your brain. Once inside your brain, drugs can change the messages your brain cells are sending to each other, and to the rest of your body. They do this by interfering with your brain's own chemical.

Protective behaviours associated with drug use which can benefit the individual and the community as mentioned. Self-esteem - Be confident. It is powerful; not only will you be able to stand firm against pressure from the crowd, but maybe the crowd might also start following you. Be completely honesty with yourself and others. The chances of recovery are good if you can face yourself and deal with confrontations from others Be patient with yourself. Everything takes time to change and it wont over night. It usually takes at least three months before significant improvement occurs, so don't give up if you don't get instant results. Remove influences that enable your drug use from your life. Factors that promote resiliency , have also been helpful to individuals in regaining themselves. Religiosity or spirituality, commitment to academic achievement, strong life skills and social competencies can improve your health. Protective factors in the family and school include strong intra familial bonds, positive family dynamics, and positive attachment to school. In the community and environmental, strongly held adult values contribute to protective factors and regulations concerning use. Adolescent friendship is a huge factor contributing as your peers influence you too and they are a protective factor.

Risk factors associated with drug use affect the individual very much in the short and long term. It's not just friends who encourage risk-taking: there are countless adverts and films that paint this behaviour as glamorous and desirable. It may be a way to gain new experiences, but there's no guarantee you'll like the end result or it will impress your peers, and there can be consequences. Binge drinking is one of the most common side affect of drug use which affects the...
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