Drug Addiction

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Drug addiction
Alex closed the bathroom stall boor behind him and locked
it. He unzipped his book bag and scrambled trough it,
searching for his escape from life. His heart was beating
faster with every second that passed by. His palms were
sweating and his mouth was dry. He kept imagining the
smoothness of alcohol flowing down his throat. He finally
felt the coldness of the bottle at the bottom of the bag.
He suddenly felt a sense of warmth, as if he was at home.
He felt at ease, light in a sense with every swig of liquor
he took. Little did he know, that with every gulp of
alcohol, he was putting more stress on his body, making him
more vulnerable to serious issues, maybe even death. Alex
was slowly becoming addicted, a common alcoholic. Perhaps,
if he and other users understood the outcome of their drug
abuse, they would think twice before taking that next hit.

About 16 million people in the United States abuse
narcotics, stimulants, and other types of legal and illegal
paraphernalia. Depending on the type and dose of the drug
being used, this abuse can have harmful and serious affects
on the user’s brain. A drug is defined as an abused
chemical that is expected to cause changes in mood or
ability. Drugs are chemicals that move through the blood.
Some of the chemicals nestle into the receptors that are
used normally by the natural transmitters that work our
brain. This invasion of the un-natural chemicals, i.e.
drugs, changes the way the brain works.

There are eight main types of drugs, illegal and legal,
that people abuse. The first type is cannabinoids, which
are hashish and marijuana. Cannabinoids produce euphoria
and relieves pain. Another type is hallucinogens that
include ecstasy and LSD. Hallucinogens alter perceptions
and feelings. The next type is a dissociative drug such as
ketamine and PCPs, which distorts perceptions of reality.
Depressants are one of the most commonly known types of
drugs. Alcohol, flunitrazepam, and GHB are included in
this group that reduces pain and anxiety, lowers
inhibitions, and produces feelings of well-being.
Narcotics are yet another type of drugs that includes
heroin and opium that produces euphoria and relieves pain.
Stimulants include amphetamines and cocaine, and increase
alertness, relieve fatigue, and produces feelings of
exhilaration and strength. Steroids are also considered
drugs that can be abused. The last types of drugs are
prescription drugs and they have varying affects depending
on the type.

Drugs have been used for thousands of years. Granted,
back in the day, most people weren’t aware of the harmful
affects of the drugs. The ancient Sumerians and Egyptians
used opium. A pastoral nomadic group in central Asia
called the Scythians utilized marijuana. The indigenous
people of the Andean highlands to endure work at high
altitudes and low temperatures used the coca plant, where
cocaine is derived from. European explorers in the New
World used tobacco and then brought it back across the

There are many reasons as to why people may do drugs.
This experiment can lead to addiction, a dangerous disease
that is very possibly deadly. Most teenagers do drugs out
of curiosity to see if the drug really works. “They want
to believe in the power of the drug.” (1:1). Opposing
adult authority or the desire to grow up and emerge into a
more mature, dependent state may be another reason. The
drug users may feel insecure about their bodies. They may
think that they are too skinny or too fat, and think drugs
will make them feel better about themselves. On that note,
they may also desire to look, perform, or feel better at any cost. Some may use to escape depression or to ease the pain of a cruel world.

Drugs affect a person’s life drastically, from their body and mental state, to how they treat others, or even how they affect the world socially. Most drugs...
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