Drug Addiction

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hat is addiction?

* Addiction has been defined as physical and psychological dependence on psychoactive substances (for example alcohol, tobacco, heroin and other drugs) which cross the blood-brain barrier once ingested, temporarily altering the chemical milieu of the brain.

* Addiction is a primary, chronic, neurobiological disease, with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. It is characterized by behaviours that include one or more of the following: impaired control over drug use, compulsive use, continued use despite harm, and craving.

What is Drug addiction?
* Drug addiction is a state of periodic or chronic intoxication produced by the repeated consumption of a drug (natural or synthetic). Drug addiction is also called as substance dependence. According to the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), substance dependence is defined as: When an individual persists in use of alcohol or other drugs despite problems related to use of the substance, substance dependence may be diagnosed. Compulsive and repetitive use may result in tolerance to the effect of the drug and withdrawal symptoms when use is reduced or stopped.

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rug addiction is a pathological or abnormal condition which arises due to frequent drug use. The disorder of addiction involves the progression of acute drug use to the development of drug-seeking behaviour, the vulnerability to relapse, and the decreased, slowed ability to respond to naturally rewarding stimuli.

Drug habituation is a condition resulting from the repeated consumption of a drug. Its characteristics include (i) a desire (but not a compulsion) to continue taking the drug for the sense of improved well-being which it engenders; (ii) little or no tendency to increase the dose; (iii) some degree of psychic dependence on the effect of the drug, but absence of physical dependence and hence of an abstinence syndrome [withdrawal], and (iv) detrimental effects, if any, primarily on the individual.

Addiction is a primary, chronic, neurobiological disease, with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. It is characterized by behaviours that include one or more of the following: impaired control over drug use, compulsive use, continued use despite harm, and craving. A definition of addiction proposed by Professor Nils Bejerot:

An emotional fixation (sentiment) acquired through learning, which intermittently or continually expresses itself in purposeful, stereotyped behaviour with the character and force of a natural drive, aiming at a specific pleasure or the avoidance of a specific discomfort.

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eer Pressure & the Desire to Fit In
 Of course peer pressure seems to be one of the reasons children may decide to use drugs. While you may have had a great conversation with your child and they know it is wrong to do drugs, they may use them anyway if they are running with the wrong group of kids. The status quo is important with children, especially teenagers. They need to feel like they fit in. This is one of the reasons that they begin to use drugs, most of their schoolmates or social friends are using drugs, and they want to fit in.

 Using Drugs to Fight Boredom
 Boredom is another common reason why children resort to using drugs. In the absence of an active social life that gives them a variety of different things to do such as sports, exercise, or other hobbies, children become bored. Remember, TV and video games are not necessarily a way to keep a child’s mind active and in fact, can be detrimental to their overall development. Make sure your child has plenty of school activities and activities outside of school as this often gives them an opportunity to meet new friends that are also staying busy. Hormones & Drugs

Emotionally teenagers are extremely susceptible to a variety of very strong...
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