Drop Out Rate

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  • Topic: Murder, Marriage, Capital punishment
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  • Published : November 12, 2010
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Lopez 1

Eng 1301.01
Professor Blakemore
22 October 2010
Comparing “Heroes”
Heroes are people who do well with their lives. Heroes are people society looks up to; people who make a difference. In Losing Private Dwyer by Lawrence Downes and In Chronicle of an American Execution by Dan Barry, Daryl Holton and Joseph Dwyer were both “Heroes,” they were men who were at one point looked up to but then everything changed. An army man is what they were. Within the two narratives, veterans Daryl Holton and Joseph Dwyer posses the same experiences, mentality, and attitude.

In the narratives the reader will understand that, Daryl Holton was from Tennessee, he had four children and a wife. Mr. Holton was an army veteran, he was known as a hero to many. When Mr. Holton came home from war he was not the same person. His wife noticed the change in her husband and decided the best thing for her and her four children was to get away from him and filed for a divorce. Mr. Holton killed his four children Stephen, Brent, Eric, and Kayla. He killed them because he thought they were better dead then living in a “profoundly troubled home.” Daryl Holton received the death penalty for killing his young children. On the other hand we have Joseph Dwyer, an army medic whom was known as a hero to all because of a picture of him saving a young boy. Joseph had a wife and a daughter. Once Joseph Dwyer came home from war he was not mentally himself. He was a changed person. His wife noticed the change and left him to save herself and their daughter. He was a nice man but suffered from post Lopez 2

traumatic stress disorder and addiction. He died at age 31. He sniffed cans that he bought from a computer store to numb his pain. His entire family knew that Joseph Dwyer never came home from the war mentally, only physically. As said in paragraph 13, page 156, “He just couldn’t get over the war, his mother Maureen, told reporter. Joseph never came home.”

Daryl Holton and Joseph Dwyer...
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