Dracula's Book Report

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  • Topic: Dracula, Bram Stoker, Quincey Morris
  • Pages : 4 (1282 words )
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  • Published : April 10, 2011
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Bram Stoker

Bram Stoker (1847-1912) is best known as the author of Dracula. Abraham Stoker was born in Clontarf, Ireland in 1847. He was a sickly child, bedridden for much of his boyhood. As a student at Trinity College, however, he excelled in athletics as well as academics, and graduated with honors in mathematics in 1870. He worked for ten years in the Irish Civil Service, and during this time contributed drama criticism to the Dublin Mail. Despite an active personal and professional life, he began writing and publishing novels, beginning with The Snake's Pass in 1890. Dracula appeared in 1897. Following Irving's death in 1905, Stoker was associated with the literary staff of the London Telegraph and wrote several more works of fiction, including the horror novels The Lady of the Shroud (1909) and The Lair of the White Worm (1911). He died in 1912. Although most of Stoker's novels were favorably reviewed when they appeared, they are dated by their stereotyped characters and romanticized Gothic plots, and are rarely read today. Even the earliest reviews frequently decry the stiff characterization and tendency to melodrama that flaw Stoker's writing. Critics have universally praised, however, his beautifully precise place descriptions. Stoker's short stories, while sharing the faults of his novels, have fared better with modern readers. Anthologists frequently include Stoker's stories in collections of horror fiction. "Dracula's Guest," originally intended as a prefatory chapter to Dracula, is one of the best known.

Author’s Purpose
Some scholars tend to agree that Stoker's purpose for writing Dracula was to tell the real-life story of Vlad “the Impaler”, a notorious historical figure who did horrible things to his captured enemies.

Historical Context
The historical context of Bram Stoker, Dracula, is the Victorian age. An era when the study of “natural philosophy” and “natural history” became “science,” and students, who, in an earlier time, had been...
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