Double Replacement Reaction

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Richard Ortiz-Luis
Sorenson, McClave
11 November 2012
Period 0
Examination of the Formation of Precipitates between Various Aqueous Solutions of Ionic Compounds 11/12/12

Background Information:
A double replacement reaction is a chemical reaction that usually takes place between two aqueous ionic compounds. In the reaction, the cation of one compound replaces the other compound’s cation that yields two produce two new and different compounds. A precipitation reaction is a chemical reaction in which the formation of a solid, as one of the products, arises “when two solutions are mixed”(Zumdahl, Decoste 184). This solid is also known as the precipitate of the reaction. One type of evidence that shows a reaction has taken place is the visible formation of a solid. This shows that a chemical reaction has taken place between the compounds by creating a new compound, one that isn’t soluble in water. Another type of evidence is the visible change in the color of the products. This shows that a chemical reaction has occurred because a new substance has formed from the two existing dissolved compounds. Another type of evidence that show a reaction has taken place is if the solution has lost or gained heat. This shows that a reaction has taken place because this means energy was either expelled or used during the reaction and can either be classified as endothermic or exothermic. Observations:

Data Table 1: Initial Colors of Reactants
potassium ferricyanide| Olive Green|
sodium phosphate| Colorless|
sodium sulfate| Colorless|
sodium hydroxide| Colorless|
sodium chloride| Colorless|
sodium carbonate| Colorless|
potassium nitrate| Colorless|
magnesium nitrate| Colorless|
iron (III) nitrate| Yellowish Hue|
zinc nitrate| Colorless|
copper (II) nitrate| Bluish Hue|
calcium nitrate| Colorless|

Pre-Lab Questions:
A double replacement reaction is a chemical reaction that usually takes place between two aqueous ionic compounds. In the reaction, the cation of one compound replaces the other compound’s cation that yields two produce two new and different compounds. One evidence that has indicated that a double-replacement reaction has occurred between two dissolved compounds is the visible formation of a solid. In this investigation, we are looking for if the two dissolved compounds react in a double replacement reaction and yield a precipitate as one of their products. Before one starts the lab, one should be wary of the hazards on the bottles of the compounds associated with this investigation. These include: corrosive to body tissues, toxic by ingestion, mild skin irritant, toxic by skin absorption, contact with acid may liberate toxic HCN gas, severely irritating to skin, eyes, and mucous membranes. Some precautions that one should take is the use of eye goggles to protect one’s eyes from any dangers that might arise from the use of these chemicals and to keep the desktop neat and clear so that no accidental spills, that have the potential to injure someone, will occur. The chemical formulas of the aqueous solutions of ionic compounds include: Fe(NO3)2, Na3PO4, NaCl, Zn(NO3)2, NaOH, Ca(NO3)2, KNO3, Mg(NO3)2, Cu(NO3)2, Na2CO3, Na2SO4, K3Fe(CN)6. Lab Data:

Data Table 2: Observations of the Reactions between each of the Reactants | potassium ferricyanide| sodium phosphate| sodium sulfate| sodium hydroxide| sodium chloride| sodium carbonate| potassium nitrate| Yellow greenish, brown precipitate| Colorless, color change, no precipitate| Colorless, no color change, no precipitate| Colorless, no color change, no precipitate| Colorless, no color change, no precipitate| Colorless, no color change, no precipitate| magnesium nitrate| Yellow greenish, no precipitate| Colorless, no color change, no precipitate| Colorless, no color change, no precipitate| Hazy, white color, no precipitate| Colorless, no color change, no precipitate| Light white, precipitate formed|...
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