Doping in Sports

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 1080
  • Published : May 5, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
A Reality We Need To Embrace
Doping in sports (Performance Enhancing Drugs) has become an issue in all sports of all levels. In the last decade the amount of players who have been caught using performance enhancing drugs has tremendously increased. Doping is considered an artificial aid. An artificial aid allows an athlete to compete at a higher level. However, these aids have technically been in use in sports since the Greeks first put on shoes in the Olympics. Doping is another artificial aid and therefore should be legal to any player in his/her sport.

Critics of doping claim that players should be competing with their “god given abilities.” However, players quit competing with their “god given abilities” as soon as the Greeks put a shoe on to run. Perhaps a batter in baseball takes HGH (Human Growth Hormone) to boost his ability to work out and get stronger, while another batter may be taking legal creatine and protein boosts to heighten their performance. While both measures accomplish what the players wants are HGH is a faster and more efficient way to produce the same results.

In the last decade alone, due to scientific advancement, doping has become one of the most popular ways athletes like to increase their abilities. Barry Bonds, professional baseball player, is being criticized by those who do not think he should be in the hall of fame for using steroids. However, Hank Aaron used Deer Antler Spray, a more natural substance that produces near the same results in testosterone levels. The two home run kings of baseball are compared on a wide scale level just because Hank Aaron did not use a “steroid.”

Critics not for the use of anabolic steroids and other testosterone boosting drugs are only against these drugs because of the simple fact of that they have some negative side effects. The result can be death if one overdoses, but is this not true of all drugs? Norman Fost (Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin)...
tracking img