Don Quixote

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  • Topic: Miguel de Cervantes, Sancho Panza, Don Quixote
  • Pages : 2 (710 words )
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  • Published : February 23, 2013
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Pamula Lanham-Keene
000074258
Don Quixote and Sancho Panza
To compare and contrast Don Quixote and Sancho Panza you must read the novel from start to finish to be able to see a clear image of the two companions. In the beginning, Quixote was a simple but a wealthy, intelligent farmer who read too many books about knights and possibly went crazy. He commenced out on his first adventure, only to be informed by the innkeeper he needed a squire, hence, appears his faithful companion Panza. The Adventures of Don Quixote by Miguel Cervantes which takes place sometime in the fifteenth or early sixteenth centuries. Imagine, if you will, medieval times, in which knights, roamed the countryside with their squire, rescuing damsels and vanquishing evil. This may sound absurd to many people in this time, but what if a person read so many books about these so-called knights that he could not determine the real from that which was read. Such is the case in Don Quixote, whom was not really a Don at all. He convinced a simple peasant named Sancho to become his squire, promising him wealth and a high spot in society. , Quixote convinced his squire that the many adventures that the two were going on were actually brave and honorable acts of chivalry, when they were only two fools running around the countryside. Quixote sees what his mind and imagination create, not that which is actually there. He retreats to a world that holds meaning for him. An example that Quixote has little grasp of reality is the windmill incident Don Quixote sees thirty monsters, as he fights his way inside. Sancho could not fathom that his master was mad, so he shuts the incident out of his mind, displaying some of the madness of Quixote in our supposedly sane squire. When Quixote does something unreasonable, Sancho despises the fact that his master might be mad and accepts some of the lunacy to make his job easier. There comes a point at which Panza refuses to continue his role as servant. Here...
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