Don Delillo's Falling Man and in the Ruins of the Future

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Don DeLillo's works on the terrorist attacks are one man's point of view of that day and how it effected their personal life. We are able to see this tragic event through the eyes of the people who witnessed the morning of Tuesday, September 11th 2001. In his article In the ruins of the future DeLillo writes about his personal experiences through the eyes of his nephew. There are a hundred thousand stories crisscrossing New York, Washington and the world. Where we are, whom we know, what we've seen or heard. People running for their lives are part of the story that is left to us (In the ruins of the future, 34). DeLillo's novel Falling man questions terrorism through the mass media. The events of September 11 were covered unstintigly. There was no confusion of roles on TV. The raw event was one thing, the coverage another. The event dominated the medium. It was bright and some of us said it was unreal, says DeLillo in In the ruins of the future and continues with his thesis in his novel: we are not witnessing the flow of information so much as pure spectacle, or information are sacred, ritually unreadable. One's perspection is easily changed by the influence of the mass media. Probably the most obvious example is the public opinion on Muslims. The sense of disarticulation we hear in the term Us and Them has never been so striking. Prior to the attacks New York's melting pot concealed the animosity against the Others. We are rich, privileged, and strong, but they are willing to die. This is our strength, to love death, to feel the claim of armed martyrdom (Falling man 178). On the Other's side, their opinion is not that different than Ours. Everything here was twisted, hypocrite, the West corrupt of mind and body, determined to shiver Islam down to bread crumbs for birds (Falling man 79). Islam is the world outside the prayer room as well as the sūrahs in the Koran. Islam is the struggle against the enemy, near the enemy and far, Jews first, for all things unjust...
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