Domestic Violence

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Kimberly Johnson
Gene Smallman
Social Science Cluster
November 2, 2010

Domestic Violence

While unemployment rates are increasing, the rise of domestic violence and stress continue to emerge. Due to the economic downturn, domestic violence precedes increasing crime rates. So far evidence and scientific research concludes economic problems manifest domestic violence. Apparently despair and desperation coincides with the ailing economy, and the recession is partially to blame. The correlation between domestic violence and economic stress results in unhealthy relationships. If you are inclined to be an abuser and face financial crisis you are at a higher risk to indulge in domestic violence, if given the opportunity.

Domestic Violence is now so pervasive because of the economic struggle, authorize figures are appalled by the significant increase in domestic violence rates. The recession has deepened and the domestic violence rates continue to rise nationwide. There are no facts to support that the failed economy is making more people violent, however what it has proven is financial strain increases the problem. During a recession especially when people have less money, the disruption to your life can be almost paralyzing. As a result the anger and rage dominates the financial strain and leads to domestic violence.

Domestic Violence is more than three times as likely to occur when couples are experiencing high levels of financial strain opposed to when they are encountering low levels of financial strain. Everyone encounters problems in relationships but financial problems can contribute the worst impact even to the most stable relationships. Financial problems can exacerbate the emotional and physical abuse and essentially will contribute to an increase in the frequency and severity of the abuse. Financial problems are always risk factors in relationships. With the declining job market, collapse of the financial markets and home foreclosures, more people are looking at unemployment and insecurity than at any time in recent history. If there is already a troubling situation, the financial strain escalates it. Even though the economy continues to falter it is important to recognize that economic stress is not the cause for domestic violence. One may ask, why does the victim continue to stay with the abuser? According to studies supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, many relationships faced massive debts, they have children, they shared the same transportation, and they feared the underlying cause of this unforgiving economy. Money is the primary source of power. People who are overly abusive normally hide income, refuse to pay child support, or maintenance and run up large debts before or during separation as acts of malicious behavior to hinder you from leaving. Studies have proven many domestic violence incidents are not reported and if they or they are classified as homicides and suicides. The most widely reported figures are based on social studies by Straus. His research conducted that roughly 6 million women a year are victims of some level of domestic violence in the US. In addition to the research; an estimated 35 million domestic violence victims that suffer the abuse in the US, the abuse has not only happened more often since the economy became depressed, but the violence has intensified.

Domestic violence providers across the nation report that calls to the domestic hotlines have increased dramatically. The demand for emergency shelters has risen exponentially and the distress calls to 911 with reports of domestic violence have increased significantly. A survey was conducted with the victims of the domestic abuse and research proved that the financial issues, job loss, stress and substance abuse were the top four reasons why the domestic violence has increased. The domestic violence rates have alarmed advocates for women and the authorities. This level of...
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