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The Doll House Backlash: Criticism, Feminism, and Ibsen
Author(s): Joan Templeton
Source: PMLA, Vol. 104, No. 1 (Jan., 1989), pp. 28-40
Published by: Modern Language Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/462329 .
Accessed: 04/10/2011 23:11
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JOAN TEMPLETON

The Doll HouseBacklash:Criticism,Feminism,and Ibsen
more. She embodies the comedy as well as the
tragedy of modern life" (vii). In the Modern Language Association'sApproaches to TeachingA Doll House, the editor speaks disparagingly of "reductionist views of [A Doll House] as a feminist drama." Summarizinga "major theme" in the volume as "the need for a broad view of the play and a condemnation of a static approach," she warns

that discussions of the play's "connectionwith feminism" have value only if they are monitored, "properly channeled and kept firmly linked to Ibsen's text" (Shafer, Introduction 32). Removing the woman question from A Doll

House is presented as part of a corrective effort to
free Ibsen from his erroneousreputationas a writer
of thesis plays, a wrongheaded notion usually
blamed on Shaw, who, it is claimed, mistakenlysaw
Ibsen as the nineteenthcentury'sgreatesticonoclast
and offered that misreading to the public as The
Quintessence of Ibsenism. Ibsen, it is now de
rigueurto explain, did not stoop to "issues."He was
a poet of the truth...
The Doll House Backlash: Criticism, Feminism, and Ibsen
Author(s): Joan Templeton
Source:
PMLA,
Vol. 104, No. 1 (Jan., 1989), pp. 28-40
Published by: Modern Language Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/462329 .
Accessed: 04/10/2011 23:11
Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at .
http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp
JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of
content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms
of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.
Modern Language Association is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to PMLA.
http://www.jstor.org