Does Othello Love Desdemona

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Iago views women as subordinate and the inferior sex; they are nothing more than objects to him. When he talks to Emilia and Desdemona and insists that women are manipulative and lustful. First he describes them in different situations and implies how manipulative they are. When they are out in public or at home, he claims they are “pictures out of doors/Bells in your parlours, wild-cats in you kitchens” (109-110). He is saying that they are beautiful and pretty as pictures in public; they have no flaws and act like angels. However, at home, he says, women are wild. They are loud like bells and not at all ladylike. He believes they have a power that not many but a few (like himself) realize. To him, women can manipulate any situation because they know how to act. At one point, they can be simply pretty, and at the next moment, they can be wretched. To prove his point, he points out what they are like when they have a conversation: “[you are] saints in your injuries, devils being offended” (111). He says that even when they are complaining, they can still be perfect, even though complaint has a negative connotation; it is ungraceful and unladylike. However at the same time, women act like devils when they are offended. Acting like devils, especially in those times, would seem like something a man would do; he makes women seems like they plan out ways to manipulate the people around them. Then, Iago makes them sound lustful. He claims that they don’t take anything seriously except what happens at night in their beds; he says, “[you are] players in your housewifery, and housewifes in…you beds!” (112). He claims that during the day, they fool around and are only serious when it comes to sex. He makes them out to be similar to prostitutes.
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