Does It Matter How Food Is Produced When People Are Starving?

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LYReNE R. DILLON
STUDENT NO: 20110111
COURSE: ENGLISH & COMMUNICATION
FINAL ASSIGNMENT

DOES IT MATTER HOW FOOD IS PRODUCED WHEN PEOPLE ARE STARVING? FINAL ASSIGNMENT

DOES IT MATTER HOW FOOD IS PRODUCED WHEN PEOPLE ARE STARVING?

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. IntroductionPg 3.

2. Famine, Hunger, Starvation and Malnutrition Pg 3.

3. The Production Process & HACCP Pg 4.

4. Food Fortification Pg 4.

5. Artificial PreservativesPg 5.

6. Genetically Engineered FoodsPg 6.

7. ConclusionPg 6.

8. BibliographyPg 7.

INTRODUCTION

“…Ensuring sufficient food supplies, is one of the most basic challenges facing any human society. Organized and efficient food production supports population growth and the development of cities and towns, trade, and other essential elements of human progress…”

According to the 2011 FAO Hunger Report – Forward by David Beckmann, there are now 925 million under nourished people in the world, and this number is expected to rise by the year 2012. Though there is more than enough food produced to feed the worlds population many people in the world “…don’t have sufficient land to grow, or income to purchase, enough food. The world produces 17% more food per person today than 30 years ago. But close to a billion people go to sleep hungry every night…” As a result food security is now a dire problem, particularly in the “Horn-of-Africa”.

Based on international food safety standards basic sanitary production and processing of food is necessary for all food supplied for general consumption, and in this regard it does matter how food is grown, harvested, transported, stored and processed.

However beyond basic quality and sanitation it really is irrelevant how food is produced and/or processed because artificial means of growing crops (pesticides, herbicides and hormones), synthetic preserving (antioxidants, antimicrobial agents and chelating agents) and genetically engineered food allow for particularly cheap, fast and resistant products.

“The Ends Do Justify the Means”

Famine, hunger, starvation and Malnutrition

Poor people tend to consumed predominantly staple grains like rice, sorghum, and maize. These are cheap and fill the stomach to quell hunger pains. But people, especially children, need more than cereals to live a healthy life. Good health depends on dietary diversity: protein from animal products, groundnuts and legumes, and the vitamins and minerals in fruits and vegetables.” Use of pesticides, artificial growing systems and genetically engineered food are necessary for quick production and longevity.

The internet defines famine as extreme food scarcity; or severe shortage of food resulting in widespread hunger or starvation. Starvation - the most extreme form of malnutrition - amounts to your body being deprived of energy, nutrients and vitamins necessary for survival.

As a direct result of lengthy starvation the physiological symptoms would include fatigue, vitamin deficiency, which can lead to more serious physical ailments like diarrhoea, anaemia, organ failure and even death.

Short term hunger vs long term starvation

In cases where food is available but unaffordable or inaccessible, for example in cases of emergency or natural disaster, most aid organizations have agreed that “cash or cash vouchers” are the most effective means of delivering food to the hungry.

According to the UN’s World Food Program (WFP), where food is available it is cheaper, faster and more efficient to fund local agricultural programmes and source foods at the point of need rather than incur the added expense of importing food which might not be a staple of the region and importing can potentially destabilizing the agricultural economy.

However, for people in a drought living a long way from and with limited access to markets, delivering food...
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