Does God Exist

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 267
  • Published : December 8, 2007
Open Document
Text Preview
Does God exist?
Does God exist? This seemingly simple question is in fact loaded with a myriad of twists and turns that scientists and theologians have debated for years without reaching an accepted conclusion. Part of the problem lies in the many definitions of God. Traditionally it is accepted that God is a supreme being, infallible, perfect, and existing outside of the material world of humanity. It is this definition that is generally used when debating God's existence. There have been several arguments made using this definition both for and against the existence of God. "Arguments for the existence of God typically include metaphysical, empirical, inductive, and subjective types. Arguments against typically include empirical, deductive, and inductive types." While no one of these arguments has been accepted as entirely accurate, they all have their respective strengths and weaknesses. A few of the better known arguments for the existence of God are the Ontological, Teleological, and Moral arguments. In contrast to this, well known arguments against God's existence include Sociological, Scientific, and Freudian arguments.

The Ontological argument for the existence of God is one based on logical deduction. The argument, presented by Anselm, defined God as a being than which no greater can be conceived. He then reasoned that, if such a being fails to exist, then a greater being, a being than which no greater can be conceived, and which exists, can be conceived. However, nothing can be greater than a being than which no greater can be conceived, so a being than which no greater can be conceived (God) exists.

Anselm's argument, while seemingly sound, is not without criticism. One of the more notable criticisms of Anselm's theory comes from Bertrand Russell. Russell's argument is based on his definition of the word exists. He argues that if you state "Cows exist" this means "There are x's such that ‘x is a cow' is true." Thus saying cows exist is not...
tracking img