Disney Ethics

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 196
  • Published : April 9, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Walt Disney Ethics
Walt Disney spent his entire life promoting happiness. He tried his best to capture the imagination and excitement of people of all walks of life. Walt had a darker side that became public during his life and more public after his death. In the 1930’s he invited the Nazi propaganda filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl to Hollywood to promote her film. Walt knew she was a Nazi and what she stood for but invited her anyways, and received public disdain. In the 1940’s he aligned himself with the Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideas, which was a known anti-communistic and anti-Semitic group. He was never outspoken about dislike for Jewish people, but by allying himself with the group he gained a public image of an anti-Semite. The Disney museum acknowledges that Walt had difficult relationships with some Jewish people and there are obvious references to anti-Semitism in some films ( The 3 Little Pigs and The Opry House ). The Disney museum points out that Walt donated too many Jewish charities and had Jewish friends, but this may be to only to satisfy his public perception that he was an anti-Semite. It was also rumored that Disney was a racist as well, due to his racial remarks and some of the dialect in his films. Disney was rumored to be many things, but he promoted racial equality in his business. He hired people of all religion, race, gender and nationality in his career.
tracking img