Discussion of Teleological Argument

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‘The world appears designed, so God exists’ (
This statement could be seen as a tenable teleological position, as it can’t be proven or disproven – Although there are significantly tenable scientific theories against it. Many philosophers have argued over this statement, with William Paley putting forth his argument for design, and Hume among others arguing against it. William Paley’s teleological argument gives the example of walking through a natural environment and finding a watch – One would assume that the watch must have been designed, rather than simply coming into existence. Therefore, there must be a designer at work. The watch represents the world, and God is the designer. Paley says there is evidence of design in the world around us – The human eye, for example, is so an intricate and complicated – How can this have come into existence with no higher creator? David Hume argued back that if the world was designed by God, who is by definition all good and all powerful – a perfect being – then anything which he designed must by necessity also be perfect. But there are many flaws and imperfections in the world, so this doesn’t match up; this implies a flawed and imperfect designer… This cannot be God, because this would go against his very definition. Paley also proposed the existence of God through order and regularity in the world, such as astronomical patterns. He stated that with no creator, there would be no such order – Things happen regularly and in patterns in the grand scheme of things; he said that God was this natural order. However, Mill challenged this by reminding Paley that the world is cruel, every day people suffer from natural disasters, and nature goes unpunished for this, while when humans do any such crime, they must pay the price. This does not seem like order at all, and if God was this ‘order’ then it would have to be a perfect order, and it certainly does not seem so. Tennant put forth a different proposal, the aesthetic argument,...
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