Discussion for Gas Law Experiment

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Pressure, Gas, Ideal gas
  • Pages : 4 (1531 words )
  • Download(s) : 1194
  • Published : September 4, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Chemistry 1061: Principles of Chemistry I Gas Laws
Gas Laws: Pressure, Volume, and Temperature
Pressure, volume, and temperature are properties of gases that reveal their relationships when any one of them is varied. Changing the temperature of a gas may change its volume or pressure, but how? What are the mathematical relationships between these properties? Are there limits to them? Scientists have discovered through the study of properties of gases that there is indeed a theoretical limit to temperature, called absolute zero. Studying the relationships between the properties of gases enables one to predict their values under given conditions. Learner Outcomes

Upon completion of this laboratory activity, the student should be able to  use the pressure probe to carry out experiments with gases.  determine the relationship between the pressure and the volume of a gas. Background

This experiment will draw upon your experience with computer-based laboratory methods from previous lab activities utilizing the computer. In the first part of the experiment, you will see how changes in volume affect the pressure of a gas. In the bonus part, you will have the opportunity to study the relationship between the temperature and pressure of a gas. You will use the Logger Pro program and a pressure-sensing probe. The data you collect in the first part of the experiment will be non-time-based, meaning you will be entering values manually. As with all computer-based experiments, your analysis of the data is the most important and precise calibration of the probes is critical. Preparing Logger Pro for Measurements

Connect the pressure sensor to Channel 1 of the LabProTM interface. You may need to an adapter to connect the probe to the interface. Open the LoggerPro application from the Start menu or desktop. Check your probe to see whether it is labeled “Pressure Sensor” or “Gas Pressure Sensor” and open the appropriate Boyle’s Law file for your specific...
tracking img