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Discursive essay on the reasons for and against euthanasia.

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Discursive essay on the reasons for and against euthanasia.

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  • Feb. 15, 2004
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Euthanasia is defined as; the intentional killing by act or omission of a dependent human being for his or her alleged benefit. (The key word here is "intentional". If death is not intended, it is not an act of euthanasia)

Voluntary euthanasia: When the person who is killed has requested to be killed.

Non-voluntary: When the person who is killed made no request and gave no consent.

Involuntary euthanasia: When the person who is killed made an expressed wish to the contrary.

Assisted suicide: Someone provides an individual with the information, guidance, and means to take his or her own life with the intention that they will be used for this purpose. When it is a doctor who helps another a person to kill them self it is called "physician assisted suicide."

Euthanasia By Action: Intentionally causing a person's death by performing an action such as by giving a lethal injection.

Euthanasia By Omission: Intentionally causing death by not providing necessary and ordinary (usual and customary) care or food and water.

Euthanasia can be traced back as far back as the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. It was sometimes allowed in these civilizations to help others die. Voluntary euthanasia was approved in these ancient societies. Today, the practice of euthanasia causes great controversy, so much so that it has been legalised in a few countries and remains illegal in the majority. Groups have been formed for and against euthanasia such as Not Dead yet, International Anti-Euthanasia Task Force, Cure and the World Federation of Doctors Who Respect Human Life.

I will begin by listing the arguments against euthanasia

1. Choosing the time and place of a person's death is nature's decision, it has already been decided. In most major religions of the world, people believe that God should decide the time and place of your death and nobody else should ever interfere with your death. This argument suggests that we should never intervene in any...