Disaster Preparedness and Response

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Disaster Preparedness and Response Measures and Actions for Specific Disasters Preparing for Emergencies (General)
Prepare For Disaster
* Set up a place to meet after a disaster. Choose an out-of-state emergency contact person. * Know different ways to get out of your home.
* Be ready to help your neighbors. Ask them to make sure you are alerted in a disaster. * Have disaster plans for work, school and child care.
* Keep emergency supplies in your house and car. Check them every six months and restock if necessary. * If you have an infant, keep extra formula.
* Tag your pet and keep extra pet supplies.
* Know how to turn off your gas, water and electricity.
* If you use medical equipment, such as a respirator, ask your utility company and fire department about emergency backup services. Show a neighbor how to operate your equipment. * Read the Survival Guide in the front of your phone book  

* Get a ground assessment of your property.
* Minimize home hazards.
* Plant ground cover on slopes and build retaining walls. * In mudflow areas, build channels or deflection walls to direct the flow around buildings. * Remember: If you build walls to divert debris flow and the flow lands on a neighbor's property, you may be liable for damages. * Learn to recognize the landslide warning signs.

* Doors or windows stick or jam for the first time. * New cracks appear in plaster, tile, brick, or foundations. * Outside walls, walks, or stairs begin pulling away from the building. * Slowly developing, widening cracks appear on the ground or on paved areas such as streets or driveways. * Underground utility lines break.

* Bulging ground appears at the base of a slope.
* Water breaks through the ground surface in new locations. * Fences, retaining walls, utility poles, or trees tilt or move. * You hear a faint rumbling sound that increases in volume as the landslide nears. The ground slopes downward in one specific direction and may begin shifting in that direction under your feet. * Make evacuation plans.

* Plan at least two evacuation routes since roads may become blocked or closed. * Develop an emergency communication plan.
* In case family members are separated from one another during a landslide or mudflow this is (a real possibility during the day when adults are at work and children are at school), have a plan for getting back together. * Ask an out-of-state relative or friend to serve as the "family contact". After a disaster, it's often easier to call long distance. Make sure everyone knows the name, address, and phone number of the contact person. * Insurance -- Mudflow is covered by flood insurance policies from the National Flood Insurance Program. Flood insurance can be purchased through a local insurance agency. * DURING

* If inside a building:
* Stay inside.
* Take cover under a desk, table, or other piece of sturdy furniture. * If outdoors:
* Try and get out of the path of the landslide or mudflow. * Run to the nearest high ground in a direction away from the path. * If rocks and other debris are approaching, run for the nearest shelter such as a group of trees or a building. * If escape is not possible, curl into a tight ball and protect your head. * Sinkholes

* A sinkhole occurs when groundwater dissolves a vulnerable land surface such as limestone, causing the land surface to collapse from a lack of support. In June 1993, a 100-foot wide, 25-foot deep sinkhole formed under a hotel parking lot in Atlanta, killing two people and engulfing numerous cars. * AFTER

* Stay away from the slide area.
There may be danger...
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