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Different Interpretations of Taming of the Shrew

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Different Interpretations of Taming of the Shrew

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  • Jan. 2013
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Different Interpretations of Taming of the Shrew - Act 2, Scene 1 (The wooing Scene)

Since there are so many different adaptations of Taming of the Shrew, there are quite a lot of differences when you see it, then when you read it. Especially when you try to imagine the Wooing Scene, in Act 2 Scene 1. Here are a few main differences I noticed in two of the different adaptations I watched:

* Gaudete Academy 2010 Production (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaebQOnnHMU)

* Petruchio was a little scared of Katherina when he first met her * Katherina was a lot more harsh, physically
* Instead of dialogue with words, they made Petruchio speak and Katherina act with facial expressions and basically actions. Petruchio: You lie in faith. For you are called Kate. Plain Kate. Bonny Kate. And sometimes Kate the curst. (Katherina flicks him annoyingly)

* Also Petruchio has long monologues, but instead they make Katherina respond with actions and not verbally. So Kate’s actions made it seem like dialogue * There is so much more physical abuse, than verbal abuse Petruchio: My super dainty Kate.

(Katherina pushes him off the stage)
* They change some words and sentences, so the audience understand the jokes and puns * A lot of interaction with the audience
Petruchio: Take this of me, Kate of my consolation: Hearing thy… hearing thy… Uh, help? What’s that sir? *Harpy* Hearing thy Harpyishness praised in every town * Taming of the Shrew (1976)
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdqOHvcD-VU)
* Baptista acts a little evil when Petruchio asks for Kate’s hand in marriage * Petruchio acts a lot more rude, physically
* Katherina struggles with Petruchio a lot more
* Katherina seems weak, even from the start
* Kate doesn’t argue as much as in the play
* Petruchio over powers Kate a lot, instead of them being equally horrid * Petruchio adds more actions, so it adds more emphasis to...