Different Family Configurations and the Effects It Has on Children

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Different Family Configurations and the Effects It Has On Children

Lashonda S Turner

PSE 6653 Educational Evaluation

Troy University


This paper will explore the different types of family configurations and the effects that they have on children. Particularly this paper will address how these family configurations affect a child academic achievement, behavior and social growth. The paper will also describe the positive and negative effects each family configuration have on children as well as the causes for such issues that children may encounter.

Different Family Configurations and the Effects It Has On Children

Throughout the pass century the configuration of families has change dramatically. Families today consist of single parents, both-parents, adapted parents and step parents. In most cases parents are their children’s first and most important teachers. The configuration of a family has both negative and positive effects on children. Families provide the social, cultural and emotional support that a child needs to function well in school as well as with their peers (Deplanty, Duchane, & Kern 2007). The learning and socialization skills for children first take place within the family and the home. “The quality and characteristics of the home environment have important consequences for child outcome” (Carlson, M & Corcoran M, 2001). Researchers have found that parents help improve the academic achievement of children and their behavior. The configuration of a family can affect academic achievement, behavior and social growth. There are various types of families in today’s society. The most common type of family is a single parent family. This particular family is becoming the norm in today’s society. Researchers Abbey, Ceballo, Lansford and Stewart (2001) found that a single parent family structure is the most at risk group. A single-parent family is one that consists of one parent that has dependent children who either live alone or in a larger household with out a mate or spouse. The number of single parent homes has grown rapidly in the pass forty years. Studies show that in 1970 only 13 percent of families were headed by single parents. Since then “over one-fourth of children in the United States lived with a single parent” (http://family.jrank.org/pages/1577/Single-Parent-Families-Effects-on-Children.html). Approximately 84 percent of single parent families are headed by women (http://family.jrank.org/pages/1577/Single-Parent-Families-Effects-on-Children.html). Researchers have found that over 50 percent of children born within this decade will be the product of a single parent who is divorce, separated or never been married (http://family.jrank.org/pages/1577/Single-Parent-Families-Effects-on-Children.html). Children living in single parent homes encounter more issues with antisocial behavior, anxiety, aggression and poor academic performance. Studies find that children from single parent homes have relational difficulties. Froma Walsh (2003) found that children that are raised by single parents are more likely to have children early, get married and divorce at an early age as an adult. Walsh (2003) also found that females raised by a single parent have a high risk of being a single parent as well. Researchers Biblarz and Gottainer (2000) found that children raised by a single parent will encounter conflict with authority figures and will not learn how achieve in market activity. The researcher Sarah Thiessen (1997) found that children are three times more likely to drop out of high school when raised by a single parent oppose to two parents. Although a single parent family can consist of the sole parent being the mother or father, the effects of that absent parent are different. Children living in mother only families encounter a lot of academic and behavioral issues. Several researchers...
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