Dickinson's Message Through Her Poetry

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Dickinson’s messages through her poetry
A poem is a composition, in verse, with a carefully selected language, to express feelings through certain rules and specifications. Some of these specifications like figurative language, poetic foot, meter, rhythm, rhyme and meter help to understand a hidden message provided by the author. Emily Dickinson, American writer, wasn’t an exception; her poems, especially I’m nobody! Who are you? had an unique technique that support the main idea, explained in this text. Emily’s lifetime was characterized for the isolation of outside world of her era. Her reclusive personality is reflected in the speakers of her poems like the case of I’m nobody! Who are you? Since the first line, Dickinson uses a mysterious tone to reveal that she is a Nobody (revealing that she is out of society). In addition, the reader could notice in the fourth line that the fact of be Nobody is a secret because the outside world doesn’t accept them or doesn’t prepared. In the second stanza, the tone is more confident and states that a Somebody is like a frog in admiring bog without a self identity. This message is accompanied of a particular style, forming a harmonious relation between the content and the structure. As part of the style of the poem, the poetic foot and the meter varies, maybe with the purpose of emphasizes the uniqueness of Nobodies. However, the second stanza follows a pattern that constitutes an alternation between iambic tetrameter and iambic trimeter like this example: How DREAR..|..y TO..|..be SOME..|..bod Y! .How PUB..|..lic, LIKE..|..a FROG To TELL..|..your NAME..|..the LIVE..|..long DAY .... To AN..|..ad MI..|..ring BOG!. Apart from the poetic foot and the meter, rhyme does not follow a determined pattern but is notorious a masculine rhyme in lines 1 - 2 like you and too or frog and bog. Also, Dickinson employs an internal rhyme as seen in line 3 (Then there’s a pair of us!). Otherwise, the author plays with the rhythm of her poem...
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