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Dfhfd

By | Jan. 2012
Page 1 of 2
How
to
Study
for
Economics?
 1. Be
best
friend
with
your
textbook.

The
lecture
notes
are
complements,
 not
substitutes,
of
your
textbook.
 a. If
you
have
a
question,
chances
are
it
has
been
answered
in
your
 textbook.

Some
people
never
realize
that
because
they
never
read
 their
textbook
(not
at
all
or
not
carefully
enough).
 b. Read
the
relevant
sections
immediately
after
the
class,
when
your
 memory
is
the
freshest.
 c. Before
the
next
class
begins,
spend
15
to
30
minutes
to
quickly
 read
through
the
materials
covered
in
the
previous
class,
so
that
 you
are
not
completely
lost
in
this
week’s
materials
and
you
know
 the
context
of
today’s
lecture,
especially
when
the
class
materials
 are
cumulative.
 2. Don’t
read
your
textbook
and
lecture
notes
superficially.

Think
about
 what
you
read.

Question
what
you
read.
 a. Check
whether
you
understand
the
logic
of
the
arguments.
 b. Check
whether
you
can
re‐construct
the
logic
of
the
arguments
 without
looking
at
your
notes
or
textbook.
 c. Check
whether
you
know
what
the
graphs
and
mathematical
 equations
mean
intuitively.
 i. Do
you
know
what
the
slope
means?
 ii. Do
you
know
what
will
shift
the
curve?
 iii. Do
you
know
what
the
mathematical
equations
mean
in
 simple
English?


 iv. Can
you
see
that
both
the
math
and
the
graphs
are
saying
 the
same
thing
in
simple
English?
 3. Understand
that
math
is
really
a
language.

So
you
should
be
able
to
say
 what
the
mathematical
equations
say
in
simple
English.

Similarly,
graphs
 are
also
a
language.

So
you
should
be
able
to
say
what
the
graphs
say
in
 simple
English
as
well.
 4. When
you
study,
don’t
memorize
what
you
read,
understand
the
logic
and
 the
arguments.
 5. When
you
answer
questions,
don’t
regurgitate
everything
you
remember,
 analyze
the
problem
using
the
logic
and
arguments
that
you
understood.

 6. Don’t
think
you
can
“smoke”
through
the
final
exam
with
“on
the
one
 hand,
this…
On
the
other
hand,
that….”
kind
answers.

It
may
or
may
not
...