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Devices and Practices for Sensory Impairments

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Devices and Practices for Sensory Impairments

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Devices and Practices for Sensory Impairments
Many students with physical disabilities and other health impairments may achieve more success if they are properly supported by an assistive technology (AT) device and AT support services. The two devices I chose were the cochlear implants for the deaf children and screen headers for the blind children. The cochlear implant is a small complex electronic device that can help provide a sense of sound. The students that will benefit from the cochlear implants will be a person who is profoundly deaf or a person who is severely hard of hearing. This device helps the child in the classroom by giving them a useful auditory understanding of the environment and it will help them understand the voices coming from the teacher and other students. The screen headers that are used for the blind, is software that attempts to identify and interpret what is being displayed on a computer classroom screen. In the classroom screen readers rely on keyboard commands so the children that are blind can access the internet. This helps because the simple fact that blind children will not benefit from the internet if they have to rely on the mouse. Characteristics of children that are blind and children that are deaf are total or partial loss of visioning and the same for hearing or loss of significant degree of both hearing and vision. To qualify for special education, hearing and or vision loss must interfere with normal learning ability. Most persons with visual disabilities will live as adults integrated society. Many people who are deaf participate more in the Deaf culture but may also live in an integrated society. Persons with deaf-blindness will usually require some degree of ongoing support. Many personal characteristics and experiences lead us to what we do in our lives, and students with disabilities are likewise influenced in different ways about their futures. For some, continuing school beyond the secondary years is a...