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EISA gratefully acknowledges the generous financial support for this project from the Royal Danish Embassy, Pretoria; the Embassy of Finland, Pretoria; and the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA), Harare.

EMBASSY OF

DANIDA

FINLAND

POLITICAL PARTIES
AND THE QUEST FOR DEMOCRATIC
CONSOLIDATION IN ZAMBIA

Tanzania

Swedish International
Development Agency

DRC

Angola

ZAMBIA
Lusaka
Zimbabwe
Botswana

ISBN 1-920095-22-5

Jotham Momba

9 781920 095222

Order from: publications@eisa.org.za

EISA RESEARCH REPORT No 17

EISA RESEARCH REPORT NO 17

POLITICAL PARTIES
AND THE QUEST FOR DEMOCRATIC
CONSOLIDATION IN ZAMBIA

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EISA RESEARCH REPORT NO 17

EISA RESEARCH REPORT NO 17

POLITICAL PARTIES
AND THE QUEST FOR DEMOCRATIC
CONSOLIDATION IN ZAMBIA

BY
JOTHAM MOMBA

2005

iii

iv

EISA RESEARCH REPORT NO 17

Published by EISA
2nd Floor, The Atrium
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Johannesburg, South Africa 2006
P O Box 740
Auckland Park
2006
South Africa
Tel: 27 11 482 5495
Fax: 27 11 482 6163
Email: eisa@eisa.org.za
www.eisa.org.za

ISBN: 1-920095-22-5
© EISA
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of EISA.

First published 2005
EISA is a non-partisan organisation which seeks to promote democratic principles, free and fair elections, a strong civil society and good governance at all levels of Southern African society.

–––––––––––– u –––––––––––– Cover photograph: Yoruba Beaded Sashes
Reproduced with the kind permission of Hamill Gallery of African Art, Boston, Ma USA

EISA Research Report, No. 17

EISA RESEARCH REPORT NO 17

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
JOTHAM C. MOMBA is an associate professor of Political Science and is currently head of the Department of Political and Administrative Studies at the University of Zambia. He has written a number of papers on issues of governance and democracy in Zambia. He holds a BA from the University of Zambia, and an MA and PhD from the University of Toronto. Prof. Momba has also taught at the University of Swaziland and as a Fulbright Scholar at Drew University in the United States.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I would like to thank the leaders of the Movement for the
Multiparty Democracy, the United Party for National
Development, the United National Independence Party, and the Forum for Democracy and Development who facilitated
interviews with their colleagues, as well as those who were
actually interviewed. I would also like to thank and acknowledge the assistance provided by several organisations, particularly the Office of the Registrar of Societies, the Electoral Commission of Zambia in accessing several relevant acts and other public

documents, as well as the library personnel of The Post newspaper and the Times of Zambia for their help in accessing their archival material. Thanks also go to my research assistant, Pheneas Bbaala.

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EISA RESEARCH REPORT NO 17

PREFACE
Multiparty democracy is becoming increasingly entrenched in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. A few SADC member states, including Botswana and Mauritius, boast long-enduring multiparty political systems implemented since their independence. Others have experienced a variety of mono-party systems (Angola, the Democratic Republic of Congo [DRC], Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe), military dictatorship (Lesotho), apartheid rule (Namibia and South Africa) or no-party dynastic regimes (Swaziland).

Since the 1990s, most SADC countries (bar Angola, the DRC and Swaziland) have undergone a phenomenal transition towards multiparty politics. Crucial as this political transition is, its exact impact on democracy remains a moot point. In both the academic and policy discourses today,...
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